Muslim Princes, Female Missionaries, and Trans-Mediterranean Migrations: The Soeurs de Saint-Joseph de l'Apparition in Tunisia, c. 1840-1881

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter explores the history of the Soeurs de Saint Joseph de l'Apparition by situating the congregation within the larger context of nineteenth-century imperialism and transnational migrations in Tunisia and the Mediterranean more generally. A variety of factors-from war to shifting labor markets-shaped the missionary sisters' methods. Focusing on teaching and medical work both intersected with the needs of trans- Mediterranean migration and won the patronage of the Husaynid Dynasty (reigned 1705-1956). The order's founder and her sisters ceaselessly importuned court officials for assistance in finding suitable residences, which, in a city such as Tunis, then experiencing massive immigration and thus housing shortages, was key to permanent settlement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIn God's Empire
Subtitle of host publicationFrench Missionaries and the Modern World
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199979318
ISBN (Print)9780195396447
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 20 2012

Keywords

  • Housing
  • Labor markets
  • Migration
  • Missionary sisters
  • Tunis
  • Tunisia
  • War

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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