Myofascial flap closure in treatment for patients with craniocervical instability and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

Connie Lu, Gal Wald, Andrew A. Marano, Jeffrey P. Greenfield, Ali A. Baaj, David M. Otterburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The benefits of decompression and fusion for patients with craniocervical instability are well described. However, complications such as wound breakdown and need for unplanned reoperation frequently occur. Recent studies have shown advantages of myofascial flap closure for various spinal procedures. This study investigated whether closure with myofascial flaps after surgery for craniocervical instability decreases complications with further subgroup analysis of patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Methods: A retrospective review of patients presenting to Weill Cornell Medical Center from 2010 to 2017 for craniocervical surgery was performed. All patients who underwent craniocervical surgery, regardless of plastic surgical involvement, were included in the study. Data including patient demographics, comorbidities, EDS diagnosis, surgical history, complications, and follow-up information were collected and analyzed. Results: Data from 57 patients were analyzed. Eighteen patients (31.6%) had craniocervical surgery without myofascial flap closure, whereas 39 (68.4%) had surgery with flap closure. In the nonflap group, 9 patients required unplanned reoperation (50%). In the flap group, there were 5 patients requiring unplanned reoperation (15%). For reoperation, the Fisher exact test 2-tailed P value is 0.0096. Of those 57 patients, 24 had EDS: 5 (20.8%) had no flap closure, whereas 19 (79.2%) had flap closure. In the no-flap group, 3 patients required unplanned reoperation (60%). In the flap group, 5 patients required unplanned reoperation (21%). For reoperation, the Fisher exact test 2-tailed P value is 0.1265. Conclusions: Patients undergoing surgery for craniocervical instability may benefit from myofascial flap closure even if they have EDS. Mobilizing wellvascularized tissue can decrease rates of reoperation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S80-S81
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume85
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cervical decompression
  • Cervical decompression and fusion
  • Complication rates
  • Craniocervical instability
  • EDS
  • Ehlers-Danlos
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
  • Muscle flaps
  • Myofascial flaps
  • Paraspinous muscle flap
  • Paraspinus flap
  • Spine closure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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