Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces

A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion

Phat L. Tran, Jessica R. Gamboa, Katherine E. Mccracken, Mark R. Riley, Marvin J Slepian, Jeong-Yeol Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Assuring cell adhesion to an underlying biomaterial surface is vital in implant device design and tissue engineering, particularly under circumstances where cells are subjected to potential detachment from overriding fluid flow. Cell-substrate adhesion is a highly regulated process involving the interplay of mechanical properties, surface topographic features, electrostatic charge, and biochemical mechanisms. At the nanoscale level, the physical properties of the underlying substrate are of particular importance in cell adhesion. Conventionally, natural, pro-adhesive, and often thrombogenic, protein biomaterials are frequently utilized to facilitate adhesion. In the present study, nanofabrication techniques are utilized to enhance the biological functionality of a synthetic polymer surface, polymethymethacrylate, with respect to cell adhesion. Specifically we examine the effect on cell adhesion of combining: 1. optimized surface texturing, 2. electrostatic charge and 3. cell adhesive ligands, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, as an ensemble of nanoparticles trapped in nanowells. Our results reveal that the ensemble strategy leads to enhanced, more than simply additive, endothelial cell adhesion under both static and flow conditions. This strategy may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of blood-contacting surfaces of cardiovascular devices subjected to flow-mediated shear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1019-1027
Number of pages9
JournalAdvanced healthcare materials
Volume2
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Bearings (structural)
Cell adhesion
Cell Adhesion
Nanoparticles
Ligands
Biocompatible Materials
Static Electricity
Biomaterials
Adhesives
Electrostatics
Adhesion
Equipment Design
Surface Properties
Texturing
Endothelial cells
Substrates
Tissue Engineering
Shear flow
Nanotechnology
Tissue engineering

Keywords

  • Cell adhesion
  • Detachment resistance
  • Ensemble surface
  • Nanopatterning
  • Nanotextured surface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces : A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion. / Tran, Phat L.; Gamboa, Jessica R.; Mccracken, Katherine E.; Riley, Mark R.; Slepian, Marvin J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol.

In: Advanced healthcare materials, Vol. 2, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 1019-1027.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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