NASA's autonomous modular scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor: Improving wildfire observations from airborne platforms

V. Ambrosia, Jeffrey S Czapla-Myers, E. Hildum

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The NASA Autonomous Modular Scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor is an airborne, 16-band line scanner with channels in the VIS-IR-MIR-TIR spectral region. Four AMS thermal channels replicate the spectral bandpass region of two of the proposed NPOESS VIIRS channels and allow improved discrimination of wildfire conditions. The AMS has operated on a range of manned and unmanned aircraft, including the NASA Ikhana UAS. On-board processors allow near-real-time Level 2 products to be derived from the spectral data and sent through a satellite link to investigators on the ground. The AMSWildfire instrument has been flown extensively in the western U.S. since 2006, supporting disaster managers with real-time fire products that define hot-spots, active fire, smoldering and post-fire conditions. The AMS has supported satellite calibration and validation efforts with collections over wildfire events simultaneously with MODIS data collections during campaigns in 2007-2010. These measurements have led to improved understanding of the satellite observations and allowed a renewed focus on the AMS sensor as an instrument capable of deriving critical fire parameters to allow improved extrapolation of wildfire thermal properties. With high spatial, temporal and radiometric measurement capabilities of the AMS instrument, improved discrimination of fire properties can be made. The "lingering" capabilities afforded by airborne platforms, allow temporal observations of fire properties, rather than the single observations provided by satellite systems. The AMS operations, successful missions, and plans for future use to support both the fire science community and the disaster management community will be highlighted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: Apr 10 2011Apr 15 2011

Other

Other34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period4/10/114/15/11

Fingerprint

NASA
Fires
Sensors
Satellites
Disasters
Satellite links
Extrapolation
Managers
Thermodynamic properties
Aircraft
Calibration

Keywords

  • AMS
  • NASA
  • UAS
  • VIS-IR-MIR-TIR
  • Wildfire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Ambrosia, V., Czapla-Myers, J. S., & Hildum, E. (2011). NASA's autonomous modular scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor: Improving wildfire observations from airborne platforms. In 34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring

NASA's autonomous modular scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor : Improving wildfire observations from airborne platforms. / Ambrosia, V.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S; Hildum, E.

34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring. 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ambrosia, V, Czapla-Myers, JS & Hildum, E 2011, NASA's autonomous modular scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor: Improving wildfire observations from airborne platforms. in 34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring. 34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 4/10/11.
Ambrosia V, Czapla-Myers JS, Hildum E. NASA's autonomous modular scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor: Improving wildfire observations from airborne platforms. In 34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring. 2011
Ambrosia, V. ; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S ; Hildum, E. / NASA's autonomous modular scanner (AMS) - Wildfire sensor : Improving wildfire observations from airborne platforms. 34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring. 2011.
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