Nasa's suborbital science program: Unmanned aircraft systems for earth science

Cheryl Yuhas, Randy Albertson, Matt Fladeland, Anthony Guillory, Frank Cutler, Jeffrey S Czapla-Myers, Susan Schoenung, Ian Mccubbin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An important goal of NASA's Suborbital Science Program is to "infuse new airborne technologies based on advances and developments in aeronautics, information technologies, and sensors systems." This includes the use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) where they can provide unique capabilities for Earth science research and applications. The Program is organized into four elements: science mission management, catalog aircraft program, airborne instrumentation, and new technology infusion. UAS topics cross all elements. The science mission management element derives strategic requirements for suborbital capabilities, including UAS, and provides the fundamental infrastructure to enable science missions and field campaigns. The aircraft catalog and airborne instrumentation elements provide and manage the facilities for NASA suborbital missions, including UAS that meet the program's requirements for proven, science-capable systems. The new technology element introduces capabilities through demonstrations of new platforms and subsystem technologies, which, if successful, are transitioned into the catalog of assets. Recently, Altair was flown with a NOAA payload to demonstrate platform capability and obtain science data off the coast of California. Plans for the summer of 2006 include flights of Altair to acquire wildfire imagery in the Western United States and for Aerosonde to participate in a tropical cyclone mission out of Key West. This paper describes the Suborbital Science Program and the role and plans for UAS within the program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1196-1207
Number of pages12
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes
EventAUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Aug 29 2006Aug 31 2006

Other

OtherAUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period8/29/068/31/06

Fingerprint

Earth sciences
Aircraft
NASA
Systems science
Aviation
Information technology
Coastal zones
Demonstrations
Sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

Yuhas, C., Albertson, R., Fladeland, M., Guillory, A., Cutler, F., Czapla-Myers, J. S., ... Mccubbin, I. (2006). Nasa's suborbital science program: Unmanned aircraft systems for earth science. 1196-1207. Paper presented at AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006, Orlando, FL, United States.

Nasa's suborbital science program : Unmanned aircraft systems for earth science. / Yuhas, Cheryl; Albertson, Randy; Fladeland, Matt; Guillory, Anthony; Cutler, Frank; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S; Schoenung, Susan; Mccubbin, Ian.

2006. 1196-1207 Paper presented at AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006, Orlando, FL, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Yuhas, C, Albertson, R, Fladeland, M, Guillory, A, Cutler, F, Czapla-Myers, JS, Schoenung, S & Mccubbin, I 2006, 'Nasa's suborbital science program: Unmanned aircraft systems for earth science' Paper presented at AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006, Orlando, FL, United States, 8/29/06 - 8/31/06, pp. 1196-1207.
Yuhas C, Albertson R, Fladeland M, Guillory A, Cutler F, Czapla-Myers JS et al. Nasa's suborbital science program: Unmanned aircraft systems for earth science. 2006. Paper presented at AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006, Orlando, FL, United States.
Yuhas, Cheryl ; Albertson, Randy ; Fladeland, Matt ; Guillory, Anthony ; Cutler, Frank ; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S ; Schoenung, Susan ; Mccubbin, Ian. / Nasa's suborbital science program : Unmanned aircraft systems for earth science. Paper presented at AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America Conference 2006, Orlando, FL, United States.12 p.
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