National Institutes of Health Funding for Tobacco Control: 2006 and 2016

Ashley L. Merianos, Judith S Gordon, Kelsi J. Wood, E. Melinda Mahabee-Gittens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The study objective was to describe and compare changes in newly funded National Institutes of Health (NIH) tobacco-related awards between fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2016. Design: Secondary analysis of NIH data. Setting: National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool database was used. Subjects: National Institutes of Health tobacco-related awards newly funded during FY2006 and FY2016. Measures: Search terms included tobacco, smoking, nicotine, secondhand smoke, and e-cigarettes. Grants and funding amounts were retrieved. Analysis: We calculated frequency distributions to determine the number and percentage of total NIH grants funded overall and by specific institute, and inflation-adjusted total and median funding amounts. We computed percentage differences in number of new grants, funding amounts, and percentage of funding allocated overall, and by institute. Results: There was a 187% increase in the percentage of total NIH funding allocated to new tobacco-related awards from 0.09% in FY2006 to 0.25% in FY2016. Total number of awards increased by 67% in FY2016 (n = 144; $56 015 931) compared to FY2006 (n = 86; $22 076 987), and there was a 154% increase in inflation-adjusted total funding for tobacco control. The top funding institutes were National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Cancer Institute; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism was third in FY2006; and National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in FY2016. Research grants were the most frequently funded. Smoking cessation was a common topic area and increased by 64%. Conclusion: NIH funding is critical for advancing the science of nicotine and tobacco research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-284
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
nicotine
Tobacco
funding
Organized Financing
health
grant
Economic Inflation
Nicotine
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.)
inflation
National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.)
smoking
Research
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Smoking Cessation
frequency distribution
Tobacco Products

Keywords

  • electronic cigarettes
  • National Institutes of Health
  • smoking cessation
  • smoking control
  • tobacco control interventions
  • tobacco smoke exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

National Institutes of Health Funding for Tobacco Control : 2006 and 2016. / Merianos, Ashley L.; Gordon, Judith S; Wood, Kelsi J.; Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 279-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merianos, Ashley L. ; Gordon, Judith S ; Wood, Kelsi J. ; Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda. / National Institutes of Health Funding for Tobacco Control : 2006 and 2016. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 279-284.
@article{e499fedfd2844cedb5b6dcc7806afdfe,
title = "National Institutes of Health Funding for Tobacco Control: 2006 and 2016",
abstract = "Purpose: The study objective was to describe and compare changes in newly funded National Institutes of Health (NIH) tobacco-related awards between fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2016. Design: Secondary analysis of NIH data. Setting: National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool database was used. Subjects: National Institutes of Health tobacco-related awards newly funded during FY2006 and FY2016. Measures: Search terms included tobacco, smoking, nicotine, secondhand smoke, and e-cigarettes. Grants and funding amounts were retrieved. Analysis: We calculated frequency distributions to determine the number and percentage of total NIH grants funded overall and by specific institute, and inflation-adjusted total and median funding amounts. We computed percentage differences in number of new grants, funding amounts, and percentage of funding allocated overall, and by institute. Results: There was a 187{\%} increase in the percentage of total NIH funding allocated to new tobacco-related awards from 0.09{\%} in FY2006 to 0.25{\%} in FY2016. Total number of awards increased by 67{\%} in FY2016 (n = 144; $56 015 931) compared to FY2006 (n = 86; $22 076 987), and there was a 154{\%} increase in inflation-adjusted total funding for tobacco control. The top funding institutes were National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Cancer Institute; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism was third in FY2006; and National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in FY2016. Research grants were the most frequently funded. Smoking cessation was a common topic area and increased by 64{\%}. Conclusion: NIH funding is critical for advancing the science of nicotine and tobacco research.",
keywords = "electronic cigarettes, National Institutes of Health, smoking cessation, smoking control, tobacco control interventions, tobacco smoke exposure",
author = "Merianos, {Ashley L.} and Gordon, {Judith S} and Wood, {Kelsi J.} and Mahabee-Gittens, {E. Melinda}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0890117118779013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "279--284",
journal = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
issn = "0890-1171",
publisher = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - National Institutes of Health Funding for Tobacco Control

T2 - 2006 and 2016

AU - Merianos, Ashley L.

AU - Gordon, Judith S

AU - Wood, Kelsi J.

AU - Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Purpose: The study objective was to describe and compare changes in newly funded National Institutes of Health (NIH) tobacco-related awards between fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2016. Design: Secondary analysis of NIH data. Setting: National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool database was used. Subjects: National Institutes of Health tobacco-related awards newly funded during FY2006 and FY2016. Measures: Search terms included tobacco, smoking, nicotine, secondhand smoke, and e-cigarettes. Grants and funding amounts were retrieved. Analysis: We calculated frequency distributions to determine the number and percentage of total NIH grants funded overall and by specific institute, and inflation-adjusted total and median funding amounts. We computed percentage differences in number of new grants, funding amounts, and percentage of funding allocated overall, and by institute. Results: There was a 187% increase in the percentage of total NIH funding allocated to new tobacco-related awards from 0.09% in FY2006 to 0.25% in FY2016. Total number of awards increased by 67% in FY2016 (n = 144; $56 015 931) compared to FY2006 (n = 86; $22 076 987), and there was a 154% increase in inflation-adjusted total funding for tobacco control. The top funding institutes were National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Cancer Institute; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism was third in FY2006; and National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in FY2016. Research grants were the most frequently funded. Smoking cessation was a common topic area and increased by 64%. Conclusion: NIH funding is critical for advancing the science of nicotine and tobacco research.

AB - Purpose: The study objective was to describe and compare changes in newly funded National Institutes of Health (NIH) tobacco-related awards between fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2016. Design: Secondary analysis of NIH data. Setting: National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool database was used. Subjects: National Institutes of Health tobacco-related awards newly funded during FY2006 and FY2016. Measures: Search terms included tobacco, smoking, nicotine, secondhand smoke, and e-cigarettes. Grants and funding amounts were retrieved. Analysis: We calculated frequency distributions to determine the number and percentage of total NIH grants funded overall and by specific institute, and inflation-adjusted total and median funding amounts. We computed percentage differences in number of new grants, funding amounts, and percentage of funding allocated overall, and by institute. Results: There was a 187% increase in the percentage of total NIH funding allocated to new tobacco-related awards from 0.09% in FY2006 to 0.25% in FY2016. Total number of awards increased by 67% in FY2016 (n = 144; $56 015 931) compared to FY2006 (n = 86; $22 076 987), and there was a 154% increase in inflation-adjusted total funding for tobacco control. The top funding institutes were National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Cancer Institute; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism was third in FY2006; and National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in FY2016. Research grants were the most frequently funded. Smoking cessation was a common topic area and increased by 64%. Conclusion: NIH funding is critical for advancing the science of nicotine and tobacco research.

KW - electronic cigarettes

KW - National Institutes of Health

KW - smoking cessation

KW - smoking control

KW - tobacco control interventions

KW - tobacco smoke exposure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061253140&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061253140&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0890117118779013

DO - 10.1177/0890117118779013

M3 - Article

C2 - 29847996

AN - SCOPUS:85061253140

VL - 33

SP - 279

EP - 284

JO - American Journal of Health Promotion

JF - American Journal of Health Promotion

SN - 0890-1171

IS - 2

ER -