Nativity and language preference as drivers of health information seeking: examining differences and trends from a U.S. population-based survey

Philip M. Massey, Brent A Langellier, Tetine Sentell, Jennifer Manganello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine differences in health information seeking between U.S.-born and foreign-born populations in the U.S. Design: Data from 2008 to 2014 from the Health Information National Trends Survey were used in this study (n = 15,249). Bivariate analyses, logistic regression, and predicted probabilities were used to examine health information seeking and sources of health information. Results: Findings demonstrate that 59.3% of the Hispanic foreign-born population reported looking for health information, fewer than other racial/ethnic groups in the sample. Compared with non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black (OR = 0.62) and Hispanic foreign-born individuals (OR = 0.31) were the least likely to use the internet as a first source for health information. Adjustment for language preference explains much of the disparity in health information seeking between the Hispanic foreign-born population and Whites; controlling for nativity, respondents who prefer Spanish have 0.25 the odds of using the internet as a first source of health information compared to those who prefer English. Conclusion: Foreign-born nativity and language preference are significant determinants of health information seeking. Further research is needed to better understand how information seeking patterns can influence health care use, and ultimately health outcomes. To best serve diverse racial and ethnic minority populations, health care systems, health care providers, and public health professionals must provide culturally competent health information resources to strengthen access and use by vulnerable populations, and to ensure that all populations are able to benefit from evolving health information sources in the digital age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 22 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

health information
Language
driver
Health
trend
language
Population
Hispanic Americans
health care
Internet
Minority Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Language Preference
Health Information Seeking
Delivery of Health Care
Health Resources
Vulnerable Populations
Insurance Benefits
Ethnic Groups
Health Personnel

Keywords

  • digital disparities
  • Health information seeking
  • health information sources
  • health promotion
  • immigrant health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nativity and language preference as drivers of health information seeking : examining differences and trends from a U.S. population-based survey. / Massey, Philip M.; Langellier, Brent A; Sentell, Tetine; Manganello, Jennifer.

In: Ethnicity and Health, 22.10.2016, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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