Necessity of Bumped Kinase Inhibitor Gastrointestinal Exposure in Treating Cryptosporidium Infection

Samuel L.M. Arnold, Ryan Choi, Matthew A. Hulverson, Deborah A. Schaefer, Sumiti Vinayak, Rama S.R. Vidadala, Molly C. McCloskey, Grant R. Whitman, Wenlin Huang, Lynn K. Barrett, Kayode K. Ojo, Erkang Fan, Dustin J. Maly, Michael W. Riggs, Boris Striepen, Wesley C. Van Voorhis

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

There is a substantial need for novel therapeutics to combat the widespread impact caused by Crytosporidium infection. However, there is a lack of knowledge as to which drug pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics are key to generate an in vivo response, specifically whether systemic drug exposure is crucial for in vivo efficacy. To identify which PK properties are correlated with in vivo efficacy, we generated physiologically based PK models to simulate systemic and gastrointestinal drug concentrations for a series of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs) that have nearly identical in vitro potency against Cryptosporidium but display divergent PK properties. When BKI concentrations were used to predict in vivo efficacy with a neonatal model of Cryptosporidium infection, these concentrations in the large intestine were the sole predictors of the observed in vivo efficacy. The significance of large intestinal BKI exposure for predicting in vivo efficacy was further supported with an adult mouse model of Cryptosporidium infection. This study suggests that drug exposure in the large intestine is essential for generating a superior in vivo response, and that physiologically based PK models can assist in the prioritization of leading preclinical drug candidates for in vivo testing.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages55-63
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume216
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Cryptosporidium
Phosphotransferases
Pharmacokinetics
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Large Intestine
Gastrointestinal Agents
Therapeutics
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Cryptosporidium
  • drug development
  • gastrointestinal
  • physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Arnold, S. L. M., Choi, R., Hulverson, M. A., Schaefer, D. A., Vinayak, S., Vidadala, R. S. R., ... Van Voorhis, W. C. (2017). Necessity of Bumped Kinase Inhibitor Gastrointestinal Exposure in Treating Cryptosporidium Infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 216(1), 55-63. DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jix247

Necessity of Bumped Kinase Inhibitor Gastrointestinal Exposure in Treating Cryptosporidium Infection. / Arnold, Samuel L.M.; Choi, Ryan; Hulverson, Matthew A.; Schaefer, Deborah A.; Vinayak, Sumiti; Vidadala, Rama S.R.; McCloskey, Molly C.; Whitman, Grant R.; Huang, Wenlin; Barrett, Lynn K.; Ojo, Kayode K.; Fan, Erkang; Maly, Dustin J.; Riggs, Michael W.; Striepen, Boris; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 216, No. 1, 01.07.2017, p. 55-63.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Arnold, SLM, Choi, R, Hulverson, MA, Schaefer, DA, Vinayak, S, Vidadala, RSR, McCloskey, MC, Whitman, GR, Huang, W, Barrett, LK, Ojo, KK, Fan, E, Maly, DJ, Riggs, MW, Striepen, B & Van Voorhis, WC 2017, 'Necessity of Bumped Kinase Inhibitor Gastrointestinal Exposure in Treating Cryptosporidium Infection' Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol 216, no. 1, pp. 55-63. DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jix247
Arnold SLM, Choi R, Hulverson MA, Schaefer DA, Vinayak S, Vidadala RSR et al. Necessity of Bumped Kinase Inhibitor Gastrointestinal Exposure in Treating Cryptosporidium Infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 Jul 1;216(1):55-63. Available from, DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jix247
Arnold, Samuel L.M. ; Choi, Ryan ; Hulverson, Matthew A. ; Schaefer, Deborah A. ; Vinayak, Sumiti ; Vidadala, Rama S.R. ; McCloskey, Molly C. ; Whitman, Grant R. ; Huang, Wenlin ; Barrett, Lynn K. ; Ojo, Kayode K. ; Fan, Erkang ; Maly, Dustin J. ; Riggs, Michael W. ; Striepen, Boris ; Van Voorhis, Wesley C./ Necessity of Bumped Kinase Inhibitor Gastrointestinal Exposure in Treating Cryptosporidium Infection. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 216, No. 1. pp. 55-63
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