Neural plasticity in the ageing brain

Sara N. Burke, Carol A Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

811 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanisms involved in plasticity in the nervous system are thought to support cognition, and some of these processes are affected during normal ageing. Notably, cognitive functions that rely on the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex, such as learning, memory and executive function, show considerable age-related decline. It is therefore not surprising that several neural mechanisms in these brain areas also seem to be particularly vulnerable during the ageing process. In this review, we discuss major advances in our understanding of age-related changes in the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex and how these changes in functional plasticity contribute to behavioural impairments in the absence of significant pathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-40
Number of pages11
JournalNature Reviews Neuroscience
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

Fingerprint

Neuronal Plasticity
Temporal Lobe
Brain
Prefrontal Cortex
Cognition
Executive Function
Nervous System
Learning
Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Neural plasticity in the ageing brain. / Burke, Sara N.; Barnes, Carol A.

In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 30-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burke, Sara N. ; Barnes, Carol A. / Neural plasticity in the ageing brain. In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 30-40.
@article{5c78253e212f42a6b1365588895b0eef,
title = "Neural plasticity in the ageing brain",
abstract = "The mechanisms involved in plasticity in the nervous system are thought to support cognition, and some of these processes are affected during normal ageing. Notably, cognitive functions that rely on the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex, such as learning, memory and executive function, show considerable age-related decline. It is therefore not surprising that several neural mechanisms in these brain areas also seem to be particularly vulnerable during the ageing process. In this review, we discuss major advances in our understanding of age-related changes in the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex and how these changes in functional plasticity contribute to behavioural impairments in the absence of significant pathology.",
author = "Burke, {Sara N.} and Barnes, {Carol A}",
year = "2006",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nrn1809",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "30--40",
journal = "Nature Reviews Neuroscience",
issn = "1471-003X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neural plasticity in the ageing brain

AU - Burke, Sara N.

AU - Barnes, Carol A

PY - 2006/1

Y1 - 2006/1

N2 - The mechanisms involved in plasticity in the nervous system are thought to support cognition, and some of these processes are affected during normal ageing. Notably, cognitive functions that rely on the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex, such as learning, memory and executive function, show considerable age-related decline. It is therefore not surprising that several neural mechanisms in these brain areas also seem to be particularly vulnerable during the ageing process. In this review, we discuss major advances in our understanding of age-related changes in the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex and how these changes in functional plasticity contribute to behavioural impairments in the absence of significant pathology.

AB - The mechanisms involved in plasticity in the nervous system are thought to support cognition, and some of these processes are affected during normal ageing. Notably, cognitive functions that rely on the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex, such as learning, memory and executive function, show considerable age-related decline. It is therefore not surprising that several neural mechanisms in these brain areas also seem to be particularly vulnerable during the ageing process. In this review, we discuss major advances in our understanding of age-related changes in the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex and how these changes in functional plasticity contribute to behavioural impairments in the absence of significant pathology.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=29244439038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=29244439038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrn1809

DO - 10.1038/nrn1809

M3 - Article

C2 - 16371948

AN - SCOPUS:29244439038

VL - 7

SP - 30

EP - 40

JO - Nature Reviews Neuroscience

JF - Nature Reviews Neuroscience

SN - 1471-003X

IS - 1

ER -