Neurobiology of emotion perception I: The neural basis of normal emotion perception

Mary L. Phillips, Wayne C. Drevets, Scott L. Rauch, Richard D Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1426 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is at present limited understanding of the neurobiological basis of the different processes underlying emotion perception. We have aimed to identify potential neural correlates of three processes suggested by appraisalist theories as important for emotion perception: 1) the identification of the emotional significance of a stimulus; 2) the production of an affective state in response to 1; and 3) the regulation of the affective state. In a critical review, we have examined findings from recent animal, human lesion, and functional neuroimaging studies. Findings from these studies indicate that these processes may be dependent upon the functioning of two neural systems: a ventral system, including the amygdala, insula, ventral striatum, and ventral regions of the anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for processes 1 and 2 and automatic regulation of emotional responses; and a dorsal system, including the hippocampus and dorsal regions of anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for process 3. We suggest that the extent to which a stimulus is identified as emotive and is associated with the production of an affective state may be dependent upon levels of activity within these two neural systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-514
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

Fingerprint

Neurobiology
Gyrus Cinguli
Emotions
Prefrontal Cortex
Functional Neuroimaging
Amygdala
Hippocampus

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Dorsal
  • Emotion
  • Limbic
  • Prefrontal
  • Ventral

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Neurobiology of emotion perception I : The neural basis of normal emotion perception. / Phillips, Mary L.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Rauch, Scott L.; Lane, Richard D.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 54, No. 5, 01.09.2003, p. 504-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Phillips, Mary L. ; Drevets, Wayne C. ; Rauch, Scott L. ; Lane, Richard D. / Neurobiology of emotion perception I : The neural basis of normal emotion perception. In: Biological Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 54, No. 5. pp. 504-514.
@article{8ef76135add54622bed432f405669fd6,
title = "Neurobiology of emotion perception I: The neural basis of normal emotion perception",
abstract = "There is at present limited understanding of the neurobiological basis of the different processes underlying emotion perception. We have aimed to identify potential neural correlates of three processes suggested by appraisalist theories as important for emotion perception: 1) the identification of the emotional significance of a stimulus; 2) the production of an affective state in response to 1; and 3) the regulation of the affective state. In a critical review, we have examined findings from recent animal, human lesion, and functional neuroimaging studies. Findings from these studies indicate that these processes may be dependent upon the functioning of two neural systems: a ventral system, including the amygdala, insula, ventral striatum, and ventral regions of the anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for processes 1 and 2 and automatic regulation of emotional responses; and a dorsal system, including the hippocampus and dorsal regions of anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for process 3. We suggest that the extent to which a stimulus is identified as emotive and is associated with the production of an affective state may be dependent upon levels of activity within these two neural systems.",
keywords = "Amygdala, Dorsal, Emotion, Limbic, Prefrontal, Ventral",
author = "Phillips, {Mary L.} and Drevets, {Wayne C.} and Rauch, {Scott L.} and Lane, {Richard D}",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0006-3223(03)00168-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "504--514",
journal = "Biological Psychiatry",
issn = "0006-3223",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurobiology of emotion perception I

T2 - The neural basis of normal emotion perception

AU - Phillips, Mary L.

AU - Drevets, Wayne C.

AU - Rauch, Scott L.

AU - Lane, Richard D

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - There is at present limited understanding of the neurobiological basis of the different processes underlying emotion perception. We have aimed to identify potential neural correlates of three processes suggested by appraisalist theories as important for emotion perception: 1) the identification of the emotional significance of a stimulus; 2) the production of an affective state in response to 1; and 3) the regulation of the affective state. In a critical review, we have examined findings from recent animal, human lesion, and functional neuroimaging studies. Findings from these studies indicate that these processes may be dependent upon the functioning of two neural systems: a ventral system, including the amygdala, insula, ventral striatum, and ventral regions of the anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for processes 1 and 2 and automatic regulation of emotional responses; and a dorsal system, including the hippocampus and dorsal regions of anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for process 3. We suggest that the extent to which a stimulus is identified as emotive and is associated with the production of an affective state may be dependent upon levels of activity within these two neural systems.

AB - There is at present limited understanding of the neurobiological basis of the different processes underlying emotion perception. We have aimed to identify potential neural correlates of three processes suggested by appraisalist theories as important for emotion perception: 1) the identification of the emotional significance of a stimulus; 2) the production of an affective state in response to 1; and 3) the regulation of the affective state. In a critical review, we have examined findings from recent animal, human lesion, and functional neuroimaging studies. Findings from these studies indicate that these processes may be dependent upon the functioning of two neural systems: a ventral system, including the amygdala, insula, ventral striatum, and ventral regions of the anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for processes 1 and 2 and automatic regulation of emotional responses; and a dorsal system, including the hippocampus and dorsal regions of anterior cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex, predominantly important for process 3. We suggest that the extent to which a stimulus is identified as emotive and is associated with the production of an affective state may be dependent upon levels of activity within these two neural systems.

KW - Amygdala

KW - Dorsal

KW - Emotion

KW - Limbic

KW - Prefrontal

KW - Ventral

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0142043000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0142043000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0006-3223(03)00168-9

DO - 10.1016/S0006-3223(03)00168-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 12946879

AN - SCOPUS:0142043000

VL - 54

SP - 504

EP - 514

JO - Biological Psychiatry

JF - Biological Psychiatry

SN - 0006-3223

IS - 5

ER -