Neuronavigation in minimally invasive spine surgery

Ziev B. Moses, Rory R. Mayer, Benjamin A. Strickland, Ryan M. Kretzer, Jean Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Ali A. Baaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Object. Parallel advancements in image guidance technology and minimal access techniques continue to push the frontiers of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). While traditional intraoperative imaging remains widely used, newer platforms, such as 3D-fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, and intraoperative CT/MRI, have enabled safer, more accurate instrumentation placement with less radiation exposure to the surgeon. The goal of this work is to provide a review of the current uses of advanced image guidance in MISS. Methods. The authors searched PubMed for relevant articles concerning MISS, with particular attention to the use of image-guidance platforms. Pertinent studies published in English were further compiled and characterized into relevant analyses of MISS of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions. Results. Fifty-two studies were included for review. These describe the use of the iso-C system for 3D navigation during C1-2 transarticular screw placement, the use of endoscopic techniques in the cervical spine, and the role of navigation guidance at the occipital-cervical junction. The authors discuss the evolving literature concerning neuronavigation during pedicle screw placement in the thoracic and lumbar spine in the setting of infection, trauma, and deformity surgery and review the use of image guidance in transsacral approaches. Conclusions. Refinements in image-guidance technologies and minimal access techniques have converged on spinal pathology, affording patients the ability to undergo safe, accurate operations without the associated morbidities of conventional approaches. While percutaneous transpedicular screw placement is among the most common procedures to benefit from navigation, other areas of spine surgery can benefit from advances in neuronavigation and further growth in the field of image-guided MISS is anticipated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE12
JournalNeurosurgical focus
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 25 2013

Keywords

  • Image guidance
  • Minimally invasive spine surgery
  • Neuronavigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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