Neuropharmacologic control of cerebral capillary permeability

Current implications for therapy of vasogenic brain edema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vasogenic brain edema occurs as a result of a diverse spectrum of central nervous system pathology. The fundamental physiologic abnormality of vasogenic brain edema is an increase in cerebral capillary permeability. It is hypothesized that the recent development of new, potent, synthetic vasopressin antagonists will make it possible to impede the formation of vasogenic brain edema by the intraventricular administration of such agents with the subsequent inhibition of the neural control of brain capillary permeability by the locus ceruleus. The action of the vasopressin antagonists should be synergistic with the anti-edema effects of central alpha-adrenergic blockade produced by phentolamine. The combination of these two modes of therapy is expected to produce an increase in intracranial pressure which will require additional forms of medical therapy to control, in spite of the overall decrease of brain parenchymal water content.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-53
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brain Edema
Capillary Permeability
Neural Inhibition
Intracranial Hypertension
Locus Coeruleus
Phentolamine
Brain
Adrenergic Agents
Edema
Therapeutics
Central Nervous System
Pathology
Water
Antidiuretic Hormone Receptor Antagonists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

@article{6d71dd2b8b544b928f4b3068a50a6864,
title = "Neuropharmacologic control of cerebral capillary permeability: Current implications for therapy of vasogenic brain edema",
abstract = "Vasogenic brain edema occurs as a result of a diverse spectrum of central nervous system pathology. The fundamental physiologic abnormality of vasogenic brain edema is an increase in cerebral capillary permeability. It is hypothesized that the recent development of new, potent, synthetic vasopressin antagonists will make it possible to impede the formation of vasogenic brain edema by the intraventricular administration of such agents with the subsequent inhibition of the neural control of brain capillary permeability by the locus ceruleus. The action of the vasopressin antagonists should be synergistic with the anti-edema effects of central alpha-adrenergic blockade produced by phentolamine. The combination of these two modes of therapy is expected to produce an increase in intracranial pressure which will require additional forms of medical therapy to control, in spite of the overall decrease of brain parenchymal water content.",
author = "Weinand, {Martin E}",
year = "1988",
doi = "10.1016/0306-9877(88)90112-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "51--53",
journal = "Medical Hypotheses",
issn = "0306-9877",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuropharmacologic control of cerebral capillary permeability

T2 - Current implications for therapy of vasogenic brain edema

AU - Weinand, Martin E

PY - 1988

Y1 - 1988

N2 - Vasogenic brain edema occurs as a result of a diverse spectrum of central nervous system pathology. The fundamental physiologic abnormality of vasogenic brain edema is an increase in cerebral capillary permeability. It is hypothesized that the recent development of new, potent, synthetic vasopressin antagonists will make it possible to impede the formation of vasogenic brain edema by the intraventricular administration of such agents with the subsequent inhibition of the neural control of brain capillary permeability by the locus ceruleus. The action of the vasopressin antagonists should be synergistic with the anti-edema effects of central alpha-adrenergic blockade produced by phentolamine. The combination of these two modes of therapy is expected to produce an increase in intracranial pressure which will require additional forms of medical therapy to control, in spite of the overall decrease of brain parenchymal water content.

AB - Vasogenic brain edema occurs as a result of a diverse spectrum of central nervous system pathology. The fundamental physiologic abnormality of vasogenic brain edema is an increase in cerebral capillary permeability. It is hypothesized that the recent development of new, potent, synthetic vasopressin antagonists will make it possible to impede the formation of vasogenic brain edema by the intraventricular administration of such agents with the subsequent inhibition of the neural control of brain capillary permeability by the locus ceruleus. The action of the vasopressin antagonists should be synergistic with the anti-edema effects of central alpha-adrenergic blockade produced by phentolamine. The combination of these two modes of therapy is expected to produce an increase in intracranial pressure which will require additional forms of medical therapy to control, in spite of the overall decrease of brain parenchymal water content.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023948471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023948471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0306-9877(88)90112-0

DO - 10.1016/0306-9877(88)90112-0

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 51

EP - 53

JO - Medical Hypotheses

JF - Medical Hypotheses

SN - 0306-9877

IS - 1

ER -