New procedures to assess executive functions in preschool children

Kimberly Andrews Espy, P. M. Kaufmann, M. L. Glisky, M. D. McDiarmid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Executive functions are difficult to assess in preschool children, yet the preschool period is particularly important, both in the development of behavioral control and of the brain, particularly the prefrontal cortex. Several tasks were adapted from developmental and neuroscience literature and then administered to 98 preschool children (30-, 36-, 42-, 48- and 60-month age groups). Executive function task performance was related largely to age group, but not to sex or intelligence. These tasks, then, were sensitive in this age range and may be useful to delineate distinct cognitive profiles among preschool children with various neurological and developmental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-58
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Executive Function
Preschool Children
Age Groups
Task Performance and Analysis
Neurosciences
Prefrontal Cortex
Nervous System Diseases
Intelligence
Brain
Preschool children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

New procedures to assess executive functions in preschool children. / Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Kaufmann, P. M.; Glisky, M. L.; McDiarmid, M. D.

In: Clinical Neuropsychologist, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2001, p. 46-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Espy, Kimberly Andrews ; Kaufmann, P. M. ; Glisky, M. L. ; McDiarmid, M. D. / New procedures to assess executive functions in preschool children. In: Clinical Neuropsychologist. 2001 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 46-58.
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