New technique to detect surface waves and measure their velocities

Tribikram Kundu, Bruce Maxfield

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A low frequency (0.5 - 2.5 Mhz) acoustic microscope is used to generate and detect surface waves in isotropic and anisotropic solids. In this microscope one transducer with a cylindrical concave front face produces a line focused ultrasonic beam which strikes the specimen at any desired angle. The reflected beam is received by another transducer. When the incident angle of the striking beam becomes equal to the critical angle of the reflector, surface waves are generated otherwise the beam is specularly reflected without generating any surface wave. It is shown in this paper that by measuring the change in the arrival time as the distance between the reflecting surface and the transducer changes one can predict if the surface waves have been generated or not. Experiments are carried out with copper and aluminum blocks and graphite-epoxy (graphite fibers in epoxy matrix) composite plate. It is found that it is easier to generate and detect surface waves in isotropic metallic blocks where Rayleigh waves are nondispersive than anisotropic graphite epoxy composite plate where Lamb waves are dispersive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAcousto-Optics and Acoustic Microscopy
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages81-98
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)0791810755
StatePublished - Dec 1 1992
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: Nov 8 1992Nov 13 1992

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division, AMD
Volume140
ISSN (Print)0160-8835

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period11/8/9211/13/92

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'New technique to detect surface waves and measure their velocities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Kundu, T., & Maxfield, B. (1992). New technique to detect surface waves and measure their velocities. In Acousto-Optics and Acoustic Microscopy (pp. 81-98). (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division, AMD; Vol. 140). Publ by ASME.