New technologies in clinical microbiology

Donna Wolk, W. Michael Dunne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid identification of microorganisms in the clinical microbiology laboratory can be of great value for selection of optimal patient management strategies for infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, mycobacteria, and parasites. Rapid identification of microorganisms in clinical samples enables expedient de-escalation from broad-spectrum agents to targeted antimicrobial therapy. The switch to tailored therapy minimizes risks of antibiotics, namely, disruption of normal flora, toxic side effects, and selective pressure. There is a critical need for new technologies in clinical microbiology, particularly for bloodstream infections, in which associated mortality is among the highest of all infections. Just as importantly, there is a need for the clinical laboratory community to embrace the practices of evidence-based interventional laboratory medicine and collaborate in translational research projects to establish the clinical utility, cost benefit, and impact of new technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume49
Issue number9 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Microbiology
Technology
Infection
Translational Medical Research
Evidence-Based Practice
Poisons
Mycobacterium
Patient Selection
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Parasites
Fungi
Medicine
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Viruses
Bacteria
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

New technologies in clinical microbiology. / Wolk, Donna; Dunne, W. Michael.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 49, No. 9 SUPPL., 09.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolk, Donna ; Dunne, W. Michael. / New technologies in clinical microbiology. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2011 ; Vol. 49, No. 9 SUPPL.
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