NICMOS cold-well displacement monitor

A portable Hubble simulator

John E. Mentzell, Malcolm B. McIntosh, John P. Schwenker, Rodger I Thompson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The anomalous motion of the near IR camera and multi-object spectrometer (NICMOS) detector arrays was originally discovered and characterized during ground optical testing, in a large, high fidelity Hubble Space Telescope (HST) simulator. To monitor the state of the cryo-mechanical system, as NICMOS traveled among several testing sties, a portable stimulus was needed. The cold-well displacement monitor (CDM) was quickly assembled from a very simple design. The 'cheaper, better, faster' approach proved to be a winner here. Off-the-shelf optics, a simplified interface to the instrument, and a limited set of requirements were used. After calibration against the large refractive aberration simulator/Hubble opto-mechanical simulator (RAS/HOMS), the CDM gave results of similar accuracy to RAS/HOMS. It became the primary tool for the difficult job of managing the NICMOS cryogen system up through launch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Pages1044-1052
Number of pages9
Volume3354
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
EventInfrared Astronomical Instrumentation - Kona, HI, United States
Duration: Mar 23 1998Mar 23 1998

Other

OtherInfrared Astronomical Instrumentation
CountryUnited States
CityKona, HI
Period3/23/983/23/98

Fingerprint

Spectrometer
simulators
Spectrometers
monitors
Monitor
Simulator
Simulators
Camera
Cameras
cameras
spectrometers
Aberrations
Aberration
aberration
Optical testing
Optical Testing
Hubble Space Telescope
Space telescopes
shelves
Mechanical Systems

Keywords

  • Hubble Space Telescope
  • Infrared camera
  • Instrument testing
  • NICMOS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Mentzell, J. E., McIntosh, M. B., Schwenker, J. P., & Thompson, R. I. (1998). NICMOS cold-well displacement monitor: A portable Hubble simulator. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 3354, pp. 1044-1052) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.317227

NICMOS cold-well displacement monitor : A portable Hubble simulator. / Mentzell, John E.; McIntosh, Malcolm B.; Schwenker, John P.; Thompson, Rodger I.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3354 1998. p. 1044-1052.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mentzell, JE, McIntosh, MB, Schwenker, JP & Thompson, RI 1998, NICMOS cold-well displacement monitor: A portable Hubble simulator. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 3354, pp. 1044-1052, Infrared Astronomical Instrumentation, Kona, HI, United States, 3/23/98. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.317227
Mentzell JE, McIntosh MB, Schwenker JP, Thompson RI. NICMOS cold-well displacement monitor: A portable Hubble simulator. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3354. 1998. p. 1044-1052 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.317227
Mentzell, John E. ; McIntosh, Malcolm B. ; Schwenker, John P. ; Thompson, Rodger I. / NICMOS cold-well displacement monitor : A portable Hubble simulator. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3354 1998. pp. 1044-1052
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