Nitrogen volatilization from Arizona irrigation waters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A laboratory study was initiated to investigate the effects of temperature (25, 30, 35, and 40°C) and water quality on the loss of fertilizer nitrogen (N) through volatilization out of irrigation waters collected from 10 different Arizona sources. A 300-mL volume of each water source was placed in 450-mL beakers open to the atmosphere in a constant-temperature water bath with 10 mg of analytical-grade ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4] dissolved into each sample. Small aliquots were drawn at specific time intervals over a 24-h period and then analyzed for ammonium (NH4 +)-N and nitrate (NO3 -)-N concentrations. Results showed potential losses from volatilization to be highly temperature dependent. Total losses (after 24 h) ranged from 30-48% at 25°C to more than 90% at 40°C. Volatilization loss of fertilizer N from irrigation waters was found to be significant and should be considered when making decisions regarding fertilizer N applications for crop production in Arizona particularly when using ammonia-based fertilizers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2378-2397
Number of pages20
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume39
Issue number15-16
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

volatilization
Vaporization
Irrigation
irrigation water
Fertilizers
nitrogen fertilizers
Nitrogen
fertilizer
irrigation
Water
nitrogen
Nitrogen fertilizers
ammonium sulfate
water
crop production
decision making
temperature
Ammonium Sulfate
water temperature
ammonia

Keywords

  • Irrigation water
  • Nitrogen
  • Volatilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science
  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Nitrogen volatilization from Arizona irrigation waters. / Norton, Elbert R; Silvertooth, Jeffrey.

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 39, No. 15-16, 09.2008, p. 2378-2397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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