(Non)Depressed Persons’ Cognitive And Affective Reactions To (Un)Successful Interpersonal Influence

Chris Segrin, James Price Dillard

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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Abstract

Weiner's (1986) theory of attribution and affect was juxtaposed with the literature on depression in order to develop hypotheses about the attributional and emotional reactions of depressed and nondepressed persons to three different outcomes of an interpersonal interaction. An experiment was conducted in which depressed and nondepressed participants, who attempted to exert interpersonal influence, met with success, ambiguity, or failure. The results showed that depressed persons reacted to success and ambiguity in a way that was both attributionally and affectively similar to the nondepressed. However, interpersonal failure provoked considerably more negative affect in persons who were depressed than those who were not depressed.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages115-134
Number of pages20
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Person
Affective
human being
Experiments
Interpersonal Interaction
Emotion
Attribution
Experiment
attribution
experiment
interaction
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

(Non)Depressed Persons’ Cognitive And Affective Reactions To (Un)Successful Interpersonal Influence. / Segrin, Chris; Dillard, James Price.

In: Communication Monographs, Vol. 58, No. 2, 1991, p. 115-134.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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