Nonlinear analysis of the movement variability structure can detect aging-related differences among cognitively healthy individuals

Mehran Asghari, Hossein Ehsani, Audrey Cohen, Talia Tax, Jane Mohler, Nima Toosizadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Studying the dynamics of nonlinear systems can provide additional information about the variability structure of the system. Within the current study, we examined the application of regularity and local stability measures to capture motor function alterations due to dual-tasking using a previously validated upper-extremity function (UEF). We targeted young (ages 18 and 30 years) and older adults (65 years or older) with normal cognition based on clinical screening. UEF involved repetitive elbow flexion without counting (ST) and while counting backward by one (DT1) or three (DT3). We measured the regularity (measured by sample entropy (SE)), local stability (measured by the largest Lyapunov exponent (LyE)), as well as conventional peak-dependent variability measures (coefficient of variation of kinematics parameters) to capture motor dynamic alterations due to dual-tasking. Within both groups, only SE showed significant differences between all pairs of UEF condition comparisons, even ST vs DT1 (p = 0.007, effect size = 0.507), for which no peak-dependent parameter showed significant difference. Among all measures, the only parameter that showed a significant difference between young and older adults was LyE (p < 0.001, effect size = 0.453). Current findings highlight the potential of nonlinear analysis to detect aging-related alterations among cognitively healthy participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102807
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Aging-related performance
  • Local Stability
  • Lyapunov exponent
  • Nonlinear analysis
  • Regularity of motion
  • Sample entropy
  • Upper extremity function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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