Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde

Min Long, Shasha Tao, Montserrat Rojo De La Vega, Tao Jiang, Qing Wen, Sophia L. Park, Donna Zhang, Georg T Wondrak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The progressive nature of colorectal cancer and poor prognosis associated with the metastatic phase of the disease create an urgent need for the development of more efficacious strategies targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Cumulative evidence suggests that the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defence, represents a promising molecular target for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. Recently, we have identified cinnamon, the ground bark of Cinnamomum aromaticum (cassia cinnamon) and Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon), as a rich dietary source of the Nrf2 inducer cinnamaldehyde (CA) eliciting the Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells, conferring cytoprotection against electrophilic and genotoxic insult. Here, we have explored the molecular mechanism underlying CA-induced Nrf2 activation in colorectal epithelial cells and have examined the chemopreventive potential of CA in a murine colorectal cancer model comparing Nrf2+/+ with Nrf2-/- mice. In HCT116 cells, CA caused a Keap1-C151-dependent increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination with upregulation of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes and elevation of cellular glutathione. After optimizing colorectal Nrf2 activation and target gene expression by dietary CA-supplementation regimens, we demonstrated that CA suppresses AOM/DSS-induced inflammatory colon carcinogenesis with modulation of molecular markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary suppression of colorectal cancer using CA supplementation was achieved in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2-/- mice confirming the Nrf2 dependence of CA-induced chemopreventive effects. Taken together, our data suggest feasibility of colorectal cancer suppression by dietary CA, an FDA-approved food additive derived from the third most consumed spice in the world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-454
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

NF-E2-Related Factor 2
Azoxymethane
Cinnamomum zeylanicum
Dextran Sulfate
Colon
Carcinogenesis
Colorectal Neoplasms
Cinnamomum aromaticum
cinnamic aldehyde
Antioxidants
Epithelial Cells
HCT116 Cells
Sri Lanka
Food Additives
Spices
Cytoprotection
Ubiquitination
Chemoprevention
Dietary Supplements
Oxidation-Reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde. / Long, Min; Tao, Shasha; De La Vega, Montserrat Rojo; Jiang, Tao; Wen, Qing; Park, Sophia L.; Zhang, Donna; Wondrak, Georg T.

In: Cancer Prevention Research, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 444-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Long, Min ; Tao, Shasha ; De La Vega, Montserrat Rojo ; Jiang, Tao ; Wen, Qing ; Park, Sophia L. ; Zhang, Donna ; Wondrak, Georg T. / Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde. In: Cancer Prevention Research. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 444-454.
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