Nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor for rapid detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

Sara Hash, M. Pilar Martinez-Viedma, Fred Fung, Jee Eun Han, Paul Yang, Charlene Wong, Loganathan Doraisamy, Suresh Menon, Donald V Lightner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative bacterium widely distributed in marine environments and a well-recognized invertebrate pathogen frequently isolated from seafood. V. parahaemolyticus may also spread into humans, via contaminated, raw, or undercooked seafood, causing gastroenteritis and diarrhea. Methods: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)-based detection system was used to detect pathogenic levels of this microorganism (105 CFU/ml) with Molecular Mirroring using iron nanoparticles coated with target-specific biomarkers capable of binding to DNA of the target microorganism. The NMR system generates a signal (in milliseconds) by measuring NMR spin–spin relaxation time T2, which correlates with the amount of microorganism DNA. Results: Compared with conventional microbiology techniques such as real-time PCR (qPCR), the NMR biosensor showed similar limits of detection (LOD) at different concentrations (105–108 CFU/ml) using two DNA extraction methods. In addition, the NMR biosensor system can detect a wide range of microorganism DNAs in different matrices within a short period of time. Conclusion: NMR biosensor represents a potential tool for diagnostic and quality control to ensure microbial pathogens such as V. parahaemolyticus are not the cause of infection. The “hybrid” technology (NMR and nanoparticle application) opens a new platform for detecting other microbial pathogens that have impacted human health, animal health and food safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBiomedical Journal
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Vibrio parahaemolyticus
Biosensing Techniques
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Seafood
DNA
Nanoparticles
Food Safety
Health
Gastroenteritis
Invertebrates
Microbiology
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Quality Control
Limit of Detection
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Diarrhea
Iron
Biomarkers
Technology
Infection

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Biosensors
  • Food safety
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor for rapid detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. / Hash, Sara; Martinez-Viedma, M. Pilar; Fung, Fred; Han, Jee Eun; Yang, Paul; Wong, Charlene; Doraisamy, Loganathan; Menon, Suresh; Lightner, Donald V.

In: Biomedical Journal, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hash, Sara ; Martinez-Viedma, M. Pilar ; Fung, Fred ; Han, Jee Eun ; Yang, Paul ; Wong, Charlene ; Doraisamy, Loganathan ; Menon, Suresh ; Lightner, Donald V. / Nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor for rapid detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In: Biomedical Journal. 2019.
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