Object working memory deficits predicted by early brain injury and development in the preterm infant

Lianne J. Woodward, Jamie O Edgin, Deanne Thompson, Terrie E. Inder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children born preterm and of very low birth weight are at increased risk of learning difficulties and educational under-achievement. However, little is known about the specific neuropsychological problems facing these children or their neurological basis. Using prospective longitudinal data from a regional cohort of 92 preterm and 103 full-term children, this study examined relations between term MRI measures of cerebral injury and structural brain development and children's subsequent performance on an object working memory task at the age of 2 years. Results revealed clear between-group differences, with preterm children having greater difficulty encoding new information in working memory than term control children. Within the preterm group, task performance at the age of 2 years was related to both qualitative MRI measures of white matter (WM) injury and quantitative measures of total and regional brain volumes assessed at term equivalent. Bilateral reductions in total tissue volumes (%region) of the following cerebral regions were specifically related to subsequent working memory performance: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, sensorimotor, parietooccipital and premotor. Associations between total cerebral tissue volumes at term (adjusted and unadjusted for intracranial volume) persisted even after the effects of WM injury were taken into account. This suggests that early disturbance in cerebral development may have an independent adverse impact on later working memory function in the preterm infant. These findings add to our understanding of the neuropathological pathways associated with later executive dysfunction in the very preterm infant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2578-2587
Number of pages10
JournalBrain
Volume128
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Memory Disorders
Short-Term Memory
Premature Infants
Brain Injuries
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Educational Status
Wounds and Injuries
Task Performance and Analysis
Child Development
Prefrontal Cortex
Learning
Brain
White Matter

Keywords

  • Brain development
  • MRI
  • Preterm
  • White matter injury
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Object working memory deficits predicted by early brain injury and development in the preterm infant. / Woodward, Lianne J.; Edgin, Jamie O; Thompson, Deanne; Inder, Terrie E.

In: Brain, Vol. 128, No. 11, 11.2005, p. 2578-2587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woodward, Lianne J. ; Edgin, Jamie O ; Thompson, Deanne ; Inder, Terrie E. / Object working memory deficits predicted by early brain injury and development in the preterm infant. In: Brain. 2005 ; Vol. 128, No. 11. pp. 2578-2587.
@article{bdb01bce4a664af3b5ca19047d2740a3,
title = "Object working memory deficits predicted by early brain injury and development in the preterm infant",
abstract = "Children born preterm and of very low birth weight are at increased risk of learning difficulties and educational under-achievement. However, little is known about the specific neuropsychological problems facing these children or their neurological basis. Using prospective longitudinal data from a regional cohort of 92 preterm and 103 full-term children, this study examined relations between term MRI measures of cerebral injury and structural brain development and children's subsequent performance on an object working memory task at the age of 2 years. Results revealed clear between-group differences, with preterm children having greater difficulty encoding new information in working memory than term control children. Within the preterm group, task performance at the age of 2 years was related to both qualitative MRI measures of white matter (WM) injury and quantitative measures of total and regional brain volumes assessed at term equivalent. Bilateral reductions in total tissue volumes ({\%}region) of the following cerebral regions were specifically related to subsequent working memory performance: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, sensorimotor, parietooccipital and premotor. Associations between total cerebral tissue volumes at term (adjusted and unadjusted for intracranial volume) persisted even after the effects of WM injury were taken into account. This suggests that early disturbance in cerebral development may have an independent adverse impact on later working memory function in the preterm infant. These findings add to our understanding of the neuropathological pathways associated with later executive dysfunction in the very preterm infant.",
keywords = "Brain development, MRI, Preterm, White matter injury, Working memory",
author = "Woodward, {Lianne J.} and Edgin, {Jamie O} and Deanne Thompson and Inder, {Terrie E.}",
year = "2005",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1093/brain/awh618",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "128",
pages = "2578--2587",
journal = "Brain",
issn = "0006-8950",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Object working memory deficits predicted by early brain injury and development in the preterm infant

AU - Woodward, Lianne J.

AU - Edgin, Jamie O

AU - Thompson, Deanne

AU - Inder, Terrie E.

PY - 2005/11

Y1 - 2005/11

N2 - Children born preterm and of very low birth weight are at increased risk of learning difficulties and educational under-achievement. However, little is known about the specific neuropsychological problems facing these children or their neurological basis. Using prospective longitudinal data from a regional cohort of 92 preterm and 103 full-term children, this study examined relations between term MRI measures of cerebral injury and structural brain development and children's subsequent performance on an object working memory task at the age of 2 years. Results revealed clear between-group differences, with preterm children having greater difficulty encoding new information in working memory than term control children. Within the preterm group, task performance at the age of 2 years was related to both qualitative MRI measures of white matter (WM) injury and quantitative measures of total and regional brain volumes assessed at term equivalent. Bilateral reductions in total tissue volumes (%region) of the following cerebral regions were specifically related to subsequent working memory performance: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, sensorimotor, parietooccipital and premotor. Associations between total cerebral tissue volumes at term (adjusted and unadjusted for intracranial volume) persisted even after the effects of WM injury were taken into account. This suggests that early disturbance in cerebral development may have an independent adverse impact on later working memory function in the preterm infant. These findings add to our understanding of the neuropathological pathways associated with later executive dysfunction in the very preterm infant.

AB - Children born preterm and of very low birth weight are at increased risk of learning difficulties and educational under-achievement. However, little is known about the specific neuropsychological problems facing these children or their neurological basis. Using prospective longitudinal data from a regional cohort of 92 preterm and 103 full-term children, this study examined relations between term MRI measures of cerebral injury and structural brain development and children's subsequent performance on an object working memory task at the age of 2 years. Results revealed clear between-group differences, with preterm children having greater difficulty encoding new information in working memory than term control children. Within the preterm group, task performance at the age of 2 years was related to both qualitative MRI measures of white matter (WM) injury and quantitative measures of total and regional brain volumes assessed at term equivalent. Bilateral reductions in total tissue volumes (%region) of the following cerebral regions were specifically related to subsequent working memory performance: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, sensorimotor, parietooccipital and premotor. Associations between total cerebral tissue volumes at term (adjusted and unadjusted for intracranial volume) persisted even after the effects of WM injury were taken into account. This suggests that early disturbance in cerebral development may have an independent adverse impact on later working memory function in the preterm infant. These findings add to our understanding of the neuropathological pathways associated with later executive dysfunction in the very preterm infant.

KW - Brain development

KW - MRI

KW - Preterm

KW - White matter injury

KW - Working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27644498851&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27644498851&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/brain/awh618

DO - 10.1093/brain/awh618

M3 - Article

C2 - 16150850

AN - SCOPUS:27644498851

VL - 128

SP - 2578

EP - 2587

JO - Brain

JF - Brain

SN - 0006-8950

IS - 11

ER -