Of what is that glass ceiling made? A study of attitudes about women and the oval office

Kate M Kenski, Erika Falk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from the 2000 National Annenberg Election Survey, this study examines the predictors of reporting that a woman or man would do a better job as president considering the national issue most important to the respondent. Gender, education, and ideology are strong predictors of presidential gender preference. Naming health care as the most important problem facing the nation is positively associated with believing a female president would do a better job. even when controlling for sociodemographic, party identification, and ideology variables. Selecting taxes as the problem is associated with believing that a male president would do a better job.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-80
Number of pages24
JournalWomen and Politics
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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president
ideology
gender
taxes
election
health care
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Of what is that glass ceiling made? A study of attitudes about women and the oval office. / Kenski, Kate M; Falk, Erika.

In: Women and Politics, Vol. 26, No. 2, 2004, p. 57-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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