Office laboratory procedures, economics of practice, patient and parent education, and urinary tract infection

J. L. Ey, M. B. Aldous, Burris R Duncan, R. L. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This review highlights recent advances in four major areas that are relevant to office practice: office laboratory procedures, economics of practice, adolescent risk-taking behavior in terms of sexually transmitted diseases, and urinary tract infections. Who should be screened for diseases and where these screening tests should be done are addressed, keeping the practicing pediatrician in mind. Next we review current office economics, including whether professional courtesy should be continued, how our practices are going to be increasingly influenced by guidelines developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, and the new Clinton Health Plan if it survives Congress, and finally how all of these issues will affect our expected income in the years ahead. As pediatricians strive to retain adolescent patients in their practices, they will need to find appropriate ways of counseling these patients concerning risk behaviors that could result in sexually transmitted diseases or HIV infections. Should we leave the comfortable confines of our offices to participate in these counseling programs for adolescents, and are there lessons from existing successful International Health Programs that we can use? Finally, urinary tract infections (UTIs) continue to be a common cause of childhood infections with possible serious long-term sequelae. Can we do a better job of diagnosing UTIs, has improved treatment become available, and is prevention of recurrences possible? Once the diagnosis has been made, how can we best evaluate these children with UTIs for underlying urologic abnormalities? It is our hope that the practicing pediatrician will be better prepared to face these issues having read this review.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-728
Number of pages12
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume6
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1994

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Patient Education
Urinary Tract Infections
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Economics
Risk-Taking
Counseling
Hope
Health
HIV Infections
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Recurrence
Infection
Pediatricians
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Office laboratory procedures, economics of practice, patient and parent education, and urinary tract infection. / Ey, J. L.; Aldous, M. B.; Duncan, Burris R; Williams, R. L.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 6, No. 6, 1994, p. 717-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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