Older Adults' Evaluations of Middle-Aged Children's Attempts to Initiate Discussion of Care Needs

Craig Fowler, Carla L. Fisher, Margaret J. Pitts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

We explored how older adults evaluated the strategies used by an adult child to initiate discussion of future care needs, and subsequently, whether these judgments affected older adults' willingness to engage in discussions about eldercare if approached in a similar fashion by one of their own children. One hundred and thirty older adults were randomly assigned to read one of four scripts depicting efforts by a middle-aged daughter to raise the topic of future care needs with her mother by implementing a variety of facework behaviors. Scripts manipulated the degree to which the daughter conveyed respect for her mother's desires for autonomy (negative face) and connection (positive face). The daughter's facework significantly predicted older parents' evaluation of her as supportive, which in turn predicted their willingness to discuss future care needs with one of their own children if they were to approach the conversation in a similar way.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-727
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Communication
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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