On the higher-order Kerr effect in femtosecond filaments

Miroslav Kolesik, D. Mirell, J. C. Diels, Jerome V Moloney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A recent experiment probing the electronic nonlinearity in the femtosecond filament indicated that the optical Kerr effect not only saturates but even changes its sign at high intensities and thus switches from self-focusing to a strongly defocusing regime. Here we examine, through simulations and experiment, some implications of such a behavior. We perform comparative simulations based on the standard model on one hand and on a model implementing the intensity-dependent Kerr effect on the other. Comparison with an experiment provides a strong indication that of these two Kerr-effect models the standard model is better in capturing the observed length of the filament. However, neither of the models can reproduce length and filament radius. Possible implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3685-3687
Number of pages3
JournalOptics Letters
Volume35
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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Kerr effects
filaments
defocusing
self focusing
indication
switches
simulation
nonlinearity
radii
electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

On the higher-order Kerr effect in femtosecond filaments. / Kolesik, Miroslav; Mirell, D.; Diels, J. C.; Moloney, Jerome V.

In: Optics Letters, Vol. 35, No. 21, 01.11.2010, p. 3685-3687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kolesik, Miroslav ; Mirell, D. ; Diels, J. C. ; Moloney, Jerome V. / On the higher-order Kerr effect in femtosecond filaments. In: Optics Letters. 2010 ; Vol. 35, No. 21. pp. 3685-3687.
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