On the link between ocean biota emissions, aerosol, and maritime clouds: Airborne, ground, and satellite measurements off the coast of California

Armin Sorooshian, Luz T. Padro, Athanasios Nenes, Graham Feingold, Allison McComiskey, Scott P. Hersey, Harmony Gates, Haflidi H. Jonsson, Steven D. Miller, Graeme L. Stephens, Richard C. Flagan, John H. Seinfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Surface, airborne, and satellite measurements over the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of California during the period between 2005 and 2007 are used to explore the relationship between ocean chlorophyll a, aerosol, and marine clouds. Periods of enhanced chlorophyll a and wind speed are coincident with increases in particulate diethylamine and methanesulfonate concentrations. The measurements indicate that amines are a source of secondary organic aerosol in the marine atmosphere. Subsaturated aerosol hygroscopic growth measurements indicate that the organic component during periods of high chlorophyll a and wind speed exhibit considerable water uptake ability. Increased average cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity during periods of increased chlorophyll a levels likely results from both size distribution and aerosol composition changes. The available data over the period of measurements indicate that the cloud microphysical response, as represented by either cloud droplet number concentration or cloud droplet effective radius, is likely influenced by a combination of atmospheric dynamics and aerosol perturbations during periods of high chlorophyll a concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberGB4007
JournalGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'On the link between ocean biota emissions, aerosol, and maritime clouds: Airborne, ground, and satellite measurements off the coast of California'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this