Ongoing vascular laboratory surveillance is essential to maximize long- term in situ saphenous vein bypass patency

C. A. Erickson, J. B. Towne, G. R. Seabrook, J. A. Freischlag, R. A. Cambria, Joseph L Mills, S. Salles-Cunha, D. F. Bandyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of ongoing graft surveillance to maximize long-term patency of lower limb in situ saphenous vein bypasses. Methods: From January 1981 to October 1994, 556 autogenous grafts were constructed in 499 patients. The distal anastomosis was at the popliteal level in 207 (37%) and the tibial level in 349 (63%). All patients were enrolled in a prospective surveillance protocol to identify lesions that compromise graft patency and were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, 6 weeks, and 3 months. Surveillance studies were then obtained every 3 months for the first 2 postoperative years and every 6 months thereafter. Results: Four-hundred-fifty abnormalities were detected in 236 grafts. The median interval from the initial procedure to detection of an abnormality was 12 months (range 0 to 113 months) and varied with the location of the defect. Later in the life of the graft, progression of atherosclerotic disease manifested as inflow obstruction at a median of 15 months, and outflow disease threatened the graft at a median of 29 months (r = 0.0003). Of the 450 surveillance abnormalities, 294 (65%) occurred within the first 2 years after operation, and 156 (35%) developed more than 2 years after operation. Of the 236 grafts that developed surveillance abnormalities, 50 (21%) developed the initial defect more than 2 years after the initial bypass procedure. Eleven percent of grafts remaining free of abnormality after 2 years went on to fail. Sixty-seven interventions were performed on 62 extremities after 24 months, with 30 involving previously unrevised grafts. Conclusions: Because lesions amenable to revision continue to develop years after vein bypass construction, perpetual surveillance is required to ensure optimal rates of graft patency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-27
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Saphenous Vein
Blood Vessels
Transplants
Disease Progression
Lower Extremity
Veins
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Ongoing vascular laboratory surveillance is essential to maximize long- term in situ saphenous vein bypass patency. / Erickson, C. A.; Towne, J. B.; Seabrook, G. R.; Freischlag, J. A.; Cambria, R. A.; Mills, Joseph L; Salles-Cunha, S.; Bandyk, D. F.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1996, p. 18-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erickson, CA, Towne, JB, Seabrook, GR, Freischlag, JA, Cambria, RA, Mills, JL, Salles-Cunha, S & Bandyk, DF 1996, 'Ongoing vascular laboratory surveillance is essential to maximize long- term in situ saphenous vein bypass patency', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 18-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(05)80031-X
Erickson, C. A. ; Towne, J. B. ; Seabrook, G. R. ; Freischlag, J. A. ; Cambria, R. A. ; Mills, Joseph L ; Salles-Cunha, S. ; Bandyk, D. F. / Ongoing vascular laboratory surveillance is essential to maximize long- term in situ saphenous vein bypass patency. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 18-27.
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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of ongoing graft surveillance to maximize long-term patency of lower limb in situ saphenous vein bypasses. Methods: From January 1981 to October 1994, 556 autogenous grafts were constructed in 499 patients. The distal anastomosis was at the popliteal level in 207 (37{\%}) and the tibial level in 349 (63{\%}). All patients were enrolled in a prospective surveillance protocol to identify lesions that compromise graft patency and were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, 6 weeks, and 3 months. Surveillance studies were then obtained every 3 months for the first 2 postoperative years and every 6 months thereafter. Results: Four-hundred-fifty abnormalities were detected in 236 grafts. The median interval from the initial procedure to detection of an abnormality was 12 months (range 0 to 113 months) and varied with the location of the defect. Later in the life of the graft, progression of atherosclerotic disease manifested as inflow obstruction at a median of 15 months, and outflow disease threatened the graft at a median of 29 months (r = 0.0003). Of the 450 surveillance abnormalities, 294 (65{\%}) occurred within the first 2 years after operation, and 156 (35{\%}) developed more than 2 years after operation. Of the 236 grafts that developed surveillance abnormalities, 50 (21{\%}) developed the initial defect more than 2 years after the initial bypass procedure. Eleven percent of grafts remaining free of abnormality after 2 years went on to fail. Sixty-seven interventions were performed on 62 extremities after 24 months, with 30 involving previously unrevised grafts. Conclusions: Because lesions amenable to revision continue to develop years after vein bypass construction, perpetual surveillance is required to ensure optimal rates of graft patency.",
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AU - Erickson, C. A.

AU - Towne, J. B.

AU - Seabrook, G. R.

AU - Freischlag, J. A.

AU - Cambria, R. A.

AU - Mills, Joseph L

AU - Salles-Cunha, S.

AU - Bandyk, D. F.

PY - 1996

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N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of ongoing graft surveillance to maximize long-term patency of lower limb in situ saphenous vein bypasses. Methods: From January 1981 to October 1994, 556 autogenous grafts were constructed in 499 patients. The distal anastomosis was at the popliteal level in 207 (37%) and the tibial level in 349 (63%). All patients were enrolled in a prospective surveillance protocol to identify lesions that compromise graft patency and were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, 6 weeks, and 3 months. Surveillance studies were then obtained every 3 months for the first 2 postoperative years and every 6 months thereafter. Results: Four-hundred-fifty abnormalities were detected in 236 grafts. The median interval from the initial procedure to detection of an abnormality was 12 months (range 0 to 113 months) and varied with the location of the defect. Later in the life of the graft, progression of atherosclerotic disease manifested as inflow obstruction at a median of 15 months, and outflow disease threatened the graft at a median of 29 months (r = 0.0003). Of the 450 surveillance abnormalities, 294 (65%) occurred within the first 2 years after operation, and 156 (35%) developed more than 2 years after operation. Of the 236 grafts that developed surveillance abnormalities, 50 (21%) developed the initial defect more than 2 years after the initial bypass procedure. Eleven percent of grafts remaining free of abnormality after 2 years went on to fail. Sixty-seven interventions were performed on 62 extremities after 24 months, with 30 involving previously unrevised grafts. Conclusions: Because lesions amenable to revision continue to develop years after vein bypass construction, perpetual surveillance is required to ensure optimal rates of graft patency.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of ongoing graft surveillance to maximize long-term patency of lower limb in situ saphenous vein bypasses. Methods: From January 1981 to October 1994, 556 autogenous grafts were constructed in 499 patients. The distal anastomosis was at the popliteal level in 207 (37%) and the tibial level in 349 (63%). All patients were enrolled in a prospective surveillance protocol to identify lesions that compromise graft patency and were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, 6 weeks, and 3 months. Surveillance studies were then obtained every 3 months for the first 2 postoperative years and every 6 months thereafter. Results: Four-hundred-fifty abnormalities were detected in 236 grafts. The median interval from the initial procedure to detection of an abnormality was 12 months (range 0 to 113 months) and varied with the location of the defect. Later in the life of the graft, progression of atherosclerotic disease manifested as inflow obstruction at a median of 15 months, and outflow disease threatened the graft at a median of 29 months (r = 0.0003). Of the 450 surveillance abnormalities, 294 (65%) occurred within the first 2 years after operation, and 156 (35%) developed more than 2 years after operation. Of the 236 grafts that developed surveillance abnormalities, 50 (21%) developed the initial defect more than 2 years after the initial bypass procedure. Eleven percent of grafts remaining free of abnormality after 2 years went on to fail. Sixty-seven interventions were performed on 62 extremities after 24 months, with 30 involving previously unrevised grafts. Conclusions: Because lesions amenable to revision continue to develop years after vein bypass construction, perpetual surveillance is required to ensure optimal rates of graft patency.

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