Opening Pandoras jar: A primer on the putative roles of CRMP2 in a panoply of neurodegenerative, sensory and motor neuron, and central disorders

Rajesh Khanna, Sarah M. Wilson, Joel M. Brittain, Jill Weimer, Rukhsana Sultana, Allan Butterfield, Kenneth Hensley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

CRMP2, also known as DPYSL2/DRP2, Unc-33, Ulip or TUC2, is a cytosolic phosphoprotein that mediates axon/dendrite specification and axonal growth. Mapping the CRMP2 interactome has revealed previously unappreciated functions subserved by this protein. Together with its canonical roles in neurite growth and retraction and kinesin-dependent axonal transport, it is now known that CRMP2 interacts with numerous binding partners to affect microtubule dynamics; protein endocytosis and vesicular cycling, synaptic assembly, calcium channel regulation and neurotransmitter release. CRMP2 signaling is regulated by post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, oxidation, proteolysis and phosphorylation; the latter being a fulcrum of CRMP2 functions. Here, the putative roles of CRMP2 in a panoply of neurodegenerative, sensory and motor neuron, and central disorders are discussed and evidence is presented for therapeutic strategies targeting CRMP2 functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-771
Number of pages23
JournalFuture Neurology
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimers disease
  • CRMP2
  • CRMP2 hyperphosphorylation
  • CRMP2/CLN6/KLC4 signaling complex
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • axon elongation
  • excitotoxicity
  • multiple sclerosis
  • neuropathic pain
  • oxidative damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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