Optical design for a Fly's eye CPV system with large, onaxis dish solar concentrator

Ryker W. Eads, Justin Hyatt, J Roger P Angel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Here we describe an optical concentrator system for CPV which uses a large dish reflector to concentrate sunlight and a small receiver with fly's eye lens array to apportion the focused sunlight equally between many multi-junction cells. The small receiver is fan cooled. This architecture is aimed at a reduction in cost of complete CPV generating systems, which include dual axis tracking. In many CPV systems the light is evenly divided by identical Fresnel lenses facing the sun, and the cells are typically housed along with the lenses in modules, backed by large, passively cooled aluminum plates. The fly's eye system advantages are that the weight, complexity and cost of the inherently large scale optical collection is reduced to just that of the 4 mm thick glass mirrors, and the small receiver packages are easier and less expensive to manufacture than large modules. A specific fly's eye generator design using two large off-axis primary reflectors and nonobscuring receivers below the collection area has been described recently by Hyatt et al. [1], and the principles have been demonstrated in a prototype. Here we describe an alternative on-axis design optimized for greater uniformity of the light distributed to the cells, and excellent tolerance to mispointing. Ray tracing analysis shows deviations in uniformity of the full spectrum of sunlight distributed to the many cells of no more than 1% for sun mispointing angles of up to 0.5° and 80% of the maximum flux reaches the CPV cells when mispointing to +/- 0.9°. In this design, the central receiver blocks 4% of the entering sunlight, however, mechanical construction is simplified with a corresponding reduction in weight and cost. Also, not all the light blocked by the receiver is wasted, since it will be used to power the receiver's cooling fan via a built-in small PV panel, eliminating parasitic power loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019
EditorsMyles Steiner, Mathieu Baudrit, Cesar Dominguez
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9780735418943
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2019
Event15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019 - Fes, Morocco
Duration: Mar 25 2019Mar 27 2019

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume2149
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Conference

Conference15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019
CountryMorocco
CityFes
Period3/25/193/27/19

Fingerprint

solar collectors
parabolic reflectors
concentrators
solar radiation
receivers
eyes
sunlight
fans (equipment)
Lens
cost
ray tracing
cells
intercellular junctions
eye lens
generators (equipment)
costs
fans
reflectors
aluminum
tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Plant Science
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Eads, R. W., Hyatt, J., & Angel, J. R. P. (2019). Optical design for a Fly's eye CPV system with large, onaxis dish solar concentrator. In M. Steiner, M. Baudrit, & C. Dominguez (Eds.), 15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019 [050005-1] (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 2149). American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5124190

Optical design for a Fly's eye CPV system with large, onaxis dish solar concentrator. / Eads, Ryker W.; Hyatt, Justin; Angel, J Roger P.

15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019. ed. / Myles Steiner; Mathieu Baudrit; Cesar Dominguez. American Institute of Physics Inc., 2019. 050005-1 (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 2149).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Eads, RW, Hyatt, J & Angel, JRP 2019, Optical design for a Fly's eye CPV system with large, onaxis dish solar concentrator. in M Steiner, M Baudrit & C Dominguez (eds), 15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019., 050005-1, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 2149, American Institute of Physics Inc., 15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019, Fes, Morocco, 3/25/19. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5124190
Eads RW, Hyatt J, Angel JRP. Optical design for a Fly's eye CPV system with large, onaxis dish solar concentrator. In Steiner M, Baudrit M, Dominguez C, editors, 15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019. American Institute of Physics Inc. 2019. 050005-1. (AIP Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5124190
Eads, Ryker W. ; Hyatt, Justin ; Angel, J Roger P. / Optical design for a Fly's eye CPV system with large, onaxis dish solar concentrator. 15th International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, CPV 2019. editor / Myles Steiner ; Mathieu Baudrit ; Cesar Dominguez. American Institute of Physics Inc., 2019. (AIP Conference Proceedings).
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