Optimal treatment of patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interest in post-resuscitation care has risen with the development of treatment modalities that can affect long-term survival rates even when begun after the systematic ischemia/reperfusion insult associated with cardiac arrest. Mild therapeutic hypothermia has become the foundation for improvement of neurologically favorable survival after cardiac arrest. Reperfusion therapy, specifically early percutaneous coronary intervention, is becoming an important adjunct to therapeutic hypothermia. Identifying which post-cardiac arrest patient had an occluded or unstable coronary vessel is difficult because such events are not reliably predicted by precedent symptoms or standard electrocardiographic analysis. Increasing clinical experience suggests that resuscitated cardiac arrest victims without an obvious noncardiac etiology should undergo emergency coronary angiography and, where indicated, percutaneous coronary intervention. If comatose, they should receive concurrent therapeutic hypothermia. Such an approach can double long-term survival rates among those successfully resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)597-605
Number of pages9
JournalJACC: Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Heart Arrest
Induced Hypothermia
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Reperfusion
Survival Rate
Therapeutics
Coma
Coronary Angiography
Resuscitation
Coronary Vessels
Emergencies
Ischemia
Survival

Keywords

  • cardiac arrest
  • hypothermia
  • optimal treatment
  • percutaneous coronary intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Optimal treatment of patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. / Kern, Karl B.

In: JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 5, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 597-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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