Oral selenium supplementation has no effect on prostate-specific antigen velocity in men undergoing active surveillance for localized prostate cancer

M. Suzanne Stratton, Amit M. Algotar, James Ranger-Moore, Steven P. Stratton, Elizabeth H. Slate, Chiu Hsieh Hsu, Patricia A. Thompson, Larry C. Clark, Frederick R. Ahmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Nutritional Prevention of Cancer trial showed a 52% lower incidence of prostate cancer in men supplemented with selenium. As a result, our study was designed to assess whether selenium supplementation attenuates the progression of prostate cancer. A phase 2 randomized, double-blind, placebocontrolled clinical trial was conducted in men with localized nonmetastatic prostate cancer who had elected to forgo active treatment and be followed by active surveillance. A total of 140 men were randomized to placebo (n = 46), 200 μg/d (n = 47), or 800 μg/d (n = 47) selenium p.o. (as selenized yeast) and followed every 3 months for up to 5 years. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity was used as a marker of prostate cancer progression and was estimated using mixed-effects regression. Adjusting for age, body mass index, baseline selenium, smoking, baseline PSA, race, PSA method, and Gleason score, PSA velocities for the 200 μg/d and 800 μg/d treatment groups were not statistically significantly different from placebo (P = 0.32 and P = 0.61, respectively). In the highest quartile of baseline selenium, men supplemented with 800 μg selenium showed statistically significantly higher PSA velocity as compared with placebo (P = 0.018). Selenium supplementation did not show a protective effect on PSA velocity in subjects with localized prostate cancer. On the contrary, supplementation with high-dose selenium was observed to be a risk factor for increased PSA velocity in men with high baseline plasma selenium concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1035-1043
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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