Oral tradition as emplacement: Ancestral Blackfoot memories of the Rocky Mountain Front

María Nieves Zedeño, Evelyn Pickering, François Lanoë

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We highlight the significance of process, event, and context of human practice in Indigenous Creation traditions to integrate Blackfoot “Napi” origin stories with environmental, geological, and archaeological information pertaining to the peopling of the Northwestern Plains, where the northern Rocky Mountain Front may have played a prominent role. First, we discuss the potential and limitations of origin stories generally, and Napi stories specifically, for complementing the fragmentary records of early human presence in the Blackfoot homeland. Second, we demonstrate the intimate connection among processes, events, place-making practices, and stories. Last, we aim to expand multivocality in the interpretation of the deep past through an archaeological practice that considers Indigenous philosophies and stories to be as valid as non-Indigenous ones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Social Archaeology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Blackfoot
  • memory work
  • oral tradition
  • paleolandscape
  • place-making
  • plains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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