Ordering the disorderly slum: Standardizing quality of life in marseille tenements and bidonvilles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

During the post-World War II boom, France implemented a comprehensive urbanism program intended to modernize and rationalize the nation by putting the city, the home, and the citizen in order. Local modernization efforts were part of the state's broader postwar reconstruction initiatives implemented in both the metropole and the colonies. Local techniciens (technocratic experts such as urban planners and public health officials) were charged with assessing and classifying diverse populations in terms of centrally defined standards of need. By situating local modernization efforts in a broader imperial context, this article examines how government officials produced and reinforced social and racial hierarchies within developing postwar welfare institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1021-1035
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Urban History
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Keywords

  • France
  • bidonville
  • migration
  • modernization
  • welfare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ordering the disorderly slum: Standardizing quality of life in marseille tenements and bidonvilles'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this