Osteosarcopenic obesity and its relationship with dyslipidemia in women from different ethnic groups of China

Dan Mo, Peishan Hsieh, Hongrong Yu, Lining Zhou, Jichun Gong, Lin Xu, Peng Liu, Gang Chen, Zhao Chen, Qiongying Deng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To explore the prevalence and ethnic differences of osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) and dyslipidemia and their relationship among Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao minorities in China. Methods: A total of 2315 Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao women aged 20–95 from Guangxi were included in this study. Questionnaire survey was carried out and their blood lipids were tested. Body compositions were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and T-score was assessed by ultrasonic examination, respectively. Results: Our study showed ethnic-specific prevalence of OSO. In older women, the incidence rates of OSO in Mulam were 4.9, 12.6, and 11.5% in Maonan, Mulam, and Hmong ethnicity, respectively. In younger group, the incidence rates of OSO were 0.4, 0.4, and 0.6%, respectively. However, there is no prevalence of OSO in Yao women in two groups. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in younger women was 22.86, 29.89, 43.35, and 80.00% in group numbering one, two, and three, respectively. In older women, it was 29.13, 39.02, 41.37, and 52.38%, respectively. Based on logistic regression analysis, after controlling for covariates, dyslipidemia in younger group was positively associated with a higher number of adverse body composition, especially for OSO (OR = 12.53, 95%CI 1.34–116.99). Compared with normal women, OSO women in older group were also more likely to have dyslipidemia (OR = 6.75, 95%CI 3.19–14.31). Conclusion: OSO may be a risk factor for dyslipidemia in the ethnic groups. Thus, efforts to promote healthy aging should be focused on preventing obesity and maintaining bone health and muscle mass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number65
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Dyslipidemias
Ethnic Groups
China
Obesity
Body Composition
Incidence
Electric Impedance
Ultrasonics
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Lipids
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Health

Keywords

  • Dyslipidemia
  • Ethnic differences
  • Osteosarcopenic obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Osteosarcopenic obesity and its relationship with dyslipidemia in women from different ethnic groups of China. / Mo, Dan; Hsieh, Peishan; Yu, Hongrong; Zhou, Lining; Gong, Jichun; Xu, Lin; Liu, Peng; Chen, Gang; Chen, Zhao; Deng, Qiongying.

In: Archives of Osteoporosis, Vol. 13, No. 1, 65, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mo, Dan ; Hsieh, Peishan ; Yu, Hongrong ; Zhou, Lining ; Gong, Jichun ; Xu, Lin ; Liu, Peng ; Chen, Gang ; Chen, Zhao ; Deng, Qiongying. / Osteosarcopenic obesity and its relationship with dyslipidemia in women from different ethnic groups of China. In: Archives of Osteoporosis. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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abstract = "Objectives: To explore the prevalence and ethnic differences of osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) and dyslipidemia and their relationship among Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao minorities in China. Methods: A total of 2315 Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao women aged 20–95 from Guangxi were included in this study. Questionnaire survey was carried out and their blood lipids were tested. Body compositions were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and T-score was assessed by ultrasonic examination, respectively. Results: Our study showed ethnic-specific prevalence of OSO. In older women, the incidence rates of OSO in Mulam were 4.9, 12.6, and 11.5{\%} in Maonan, Mulam, and Hmong ethnicity, respectively. In younger group, the incidence rates of OSO were 0.4, 0.4, and 0.6{\%}, respectively. However, there is no prevalence of OSO in Yao women in two groups. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in younger women was 22.86, 29.89, 43.35, and 80.00{\%} in group numbering one, two, and three, respectively. In older women, it was 29.13, 39.02, 41.37, and 52.38{\%}, respectively. Based on logistic regression analysis, after controlling for covariates, dyslipidemia in younger group was positively associated with a higher number of adverse body composition, especially for OSO (OR = 12.53, 95{\%}CI 1.34–116.99). Compared with normal women, OSO women in older group were also more likely to have dyslipidemia (OR = 6.75, 95{\%}CI 3.19–14.31). Conclusion: OSO may be a risk factor for dyslipidemia in the ethnic groups. Thus, efforts to promote healthy aging should be focused on preventing obesity and maintaining bone health and muscle mass.",
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T1 - Osteosarcopenic obesity and its relationship with dyslipidemia in women from different ethnic groups of China

AU - Mo, Dan

AU - Hsieh, Peishan

AU - Yu, Hongrong

AU - Zhou, Lining

AU - Gong, Jichun

AU - Xu, Lin

AU - Liu, Peng

AU - Chen, Gang

AU - Chen, Zhao

AU - Deng, Qiongying

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N2 - Objectives: To explore the prevalence and ethnic differences of osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) and dyslipidemia and their relationship among Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao minorities in China. Methods: A total of 2315 Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao women aged 20–95 from Guangxi were included in this study. Questionnaire survey was carried out and their blood lipids were tested. Body compositions were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and T-score was assessed by ultrasonic examination, respectively. Results: Our study showed ethnic-specific prevalence of OSO. In older women, the incidence rates of OSO in Mulam were 4.9, 12.6, and 11.5% in Maonan, Mulam, and Hmong ethnicity, respectively. In younger group, the incidence rates of OSO were 0.4, 0.4, and 0.6%, respectively. However, there is no prevalence of OSO in Yao women in two groups. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in younger women was 22.86, 29.89, 43.35, and 80.00% in group numbering one, two, and three, respectively. In older women, it was 29.13, 39.02, 41.37, and 52.38%, respectively. Based on logistic regression analysis, after controlling for covariates, dyslipidemia in younger group was positively associated with a higher number of adverse body composition, especially for OSO (OR = 12.53, 95%CI 1.34–116.99). Compared with normal women, OSO women in older group were also more likely to have dyslipidemia (OR = 6.75, 95%CI 3.19–14.31). Conclusion: OSO may be a risk factor for dyslipidemia in the ethnic groups. Thus, efforts to promote healthy aging should be focused on preventing obesity and maintaining bone health and muscle mass.

AB - Objectives: To explore the prevalence and ethnic differences of osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) and dyslipidemia and their relationship among Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao minorities in China. Methods: A total of 2315 Maonan, Mulam, Hmong, and Yao women aged 20–95 from Guangxi were included in this study. Questionnaire survey was carried out and their blood lipids were tested. Body compositions were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and T-score was assessed by ultrasonic examination, respectively. Results: Our study showed ethnic-specific prevalence of OSO. In older women, the incidence rates of OSO in Mulam were 4.9, 12.6, and 11.5% in Maonan, Mulam, and Hmong ethnicity, respectively. In younger group, the incidence rates of OSO were 0.4, 0.4, and 0.6%, respectively. However, there is no prevalence of OSO in Yao women in two groups. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in younger women was 22.86, 29.89, 43.35, and 80.00% in group numbering one, two, and three, respectively. In older women, it was 29.13, 39.02, 41.37, and 52.38%, respectively. Based on logistic regression analysis, after controlling for covariates, dyslipidemia in younger group was positively associated with a higher number of adverse body composition, especially for OSO (OR = 12.53, 95%CI 1.34–116.99). Compared with normal women, OSO women in older group were also more likely to have dyslipidemia (OR = 6.75, 95%CI 3.19–14.31). Conclusion: OSO may be a risk factor for dyslipidemia in the ethnic groups. Thus, efforts to promote healthy aging should be focused on preventing obesity and maintaining bone health and muscle mass.

KW - Dyslipidemia

KW - Ethnic differences

KW - Osteosarcopenic obesity

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