Out-of-pocket expenditures for oral contraceptives and number of packs per purchase.

Kathryn A. Phillips, Naomi E. Stotland, Su Ying Liang, Joanne Spetz, Jennifer S. Haas, Eyal - Oren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Two potential barriers to use of oral contraceptives (OCPs) are out-of-pocket expenditures and the inconvenience of monthly pharmacy visits. This study used nationally representative data to examine the out-of-pocket costs of OCPs and whether women obtain more than 1 pack per purchase. METHODS: We used data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Dependent variables were out-of-pocket expenditures per pack and the number of packs obtained per purchase. Chi2 tests were used to examine the bivariate relationships between the dependent variables and covariates. Regression analyses were used to examine the predictors of OCP expenditures and the number of packs obtained per purchase. RESULTS: Women paid an average of 14 dollars per pack of OCPs, and 73% obtained only 1 pack per purchase. On average, privately insured women paid 60% of the total expenditures for OCPs. Women who had no prescription drug coverage, who were uninsured, or who were privately insured but not in managed care plans had higher out-of-pocket expenditures. Women who were without prescription drug coverage or who were in managed care plans were more likely to obtain only 1 pack per purchase. CONCLUSION: Out-of-pocket costs and dispensing restrictions may be barriers to consistent use of OCPs. Women's health care providers should consider options to overcome these barriers, such as the use of mail order prescription services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Medical Women's Association
Volume59
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Oral Contraceptives
Health Expenditures
Prescription Drugs
Managed Care Programs
Postal Service
Women's Health
Health Personnel
Prescriptions
Regression Analysis

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Out-of-pocket expenditures for oral contraceptives and number of packs per purchase. / Phillips, Kathryn A.; Stotland, Naomi E.; Liang, Su Ying; Spetz, Joanne; Haas, Jennifer S.; Oren, Eyal -.

In: Journal of the American Medical Women's Association, Vol. 59, No. 1, 2004, p. 36-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Phillips, Kathryn A. ; Stotland, Naomi E. ; Liang, Su Ying ; Spetz, Joanne ; Haas, Jennifer S. ; Oren, Eyal -. / Out-of-pocket expenditures for oral contraceptives and number of packs per purchase. In: Journal of the American Medical Women's Association. 2004 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 36-42.
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