Outcomes from the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea Study

Rohit Budhiraja, Stuart F Quan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical problem in children; however, the clinical, anatomic, and physiologic correlates of SDB have not been studied extensively in a general population sample using polysomnography to document the presence of SDB. The Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea Study is a longitudinal cohort study of 503 Caucasian and Hispanic children aged 6 to 12 years old who underwent polysomnography and neurocognitive testing at the time of recruitment. Subsets of the cohort had additional MR imaging and pulmonary physiologic testing. Initial cross-sectional analyses indicate that SDB is associated with behavioral abnormalities, hypertension, learning problems, and clinical symptoms such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness. Future follow-up of the cohort will assess the impact of SDB on subsequent childhood development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-18
Number of pages10
JournalSleep Medicine Clinics
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Polysomnography
Snoring
Hispanic Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Learning
Hypertension
Lung
Population

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Children
  • Epidemiology
  • Hypertension
  • Learning
  • Sleep-disordered breathing
  • TuCASA
  • Ventilatory drive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Outcomes from the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea Study. / Budhiraja, Rohit; Quan, Stuart F.

In: Sleep Medicine Clinics, Vol. 4, No. 1, 03.2009, p. 9-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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