OWNERSHIP AND THE REGULATION OF WILDLIFE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of wildlife resources is governed by a combination of private contracts and public regulations. Most often, private landowners control access rights, and government agencies regulate hunting and other uses. This paper shows that these institutions depend on wildlife values and the ability of private landowners to control access to species that inhabit their land. Logit regressions and literary sources are used to test implications about private hunting rights and state regulations. The data support the view that private, legal, and political forces have led to institutions that vary in ways consistent with wealth maximization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-260
Number of pages12
JournalEconomic Inquiry
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Access control
Wildlife
Hunting
Ownership
Resources
Public regulation
Logit regression
Wealth
State regulation
Government agencies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

OWNERSHIP AND THE REGULATION OF WILDLIFE. / Lueck, Dean L.

In: Economic Inquiry, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.01.1991, p. 249-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lueck, Dean L. / OWNERSHIP AND THE REGULATION OF WILDLIFE. In: Economic Inquiry. 1991 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 249-260.
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