Paleoclimatic evidence for future ice-sheet instability and rapid sea-level rise

Jonathan T. Overpeck, Bette L. Otto-Bliesner, Gifford H. Miller, Daniel R. Muhs, Richard B. Alley, Jeffrey T. Kiehl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

340 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sea-level rise from melting of polar ice sheets is one of the largest potential threats of future climate change. Polar warming by the year 2100 may reach levels similar to those of 130,000 to 127,000 years ago that were associated with sea levels several meters above modern levels; both the Greenland Ice Sheet and portions of the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be vulnerable. The record of past ice-sheet melting indicates that the rate of future melting and related sea-level rise could be faster than widely thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1747-1750
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume311
Issue number5768
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 24 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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    Overpeck, J. T., Otto-Bliesner, B. L., Miller, G. H., Muhs, D. R., Alley, R. B., & Kiehl, J. T. (2006). Paleoclimatic evidence for future ice-sheet instability and rapid sea-level rise. Science, 311(5768), 1747-1750. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1115159