Paleodiet reconstruction of human remains from the archaeological site of Natfieh, northern Jordan

Khaled Al-Bashaireh, Abdullah Al-Shorman, Jerome Rose, A.J. Timothy Jull, Gregory Hodgins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation concerns human teeth and bones from the site of Natfieh, north Jordan. Nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses were used to model the paleo-economy by reconstructing Natfieh's paleodiet during a specific time period. 14C dating of human teeth and bones from the site of Natfieh, north Jordan, demonstrate that they belong to the Early Roman period and match the archaeological date from the tomb and grave goods typology. Stable isotope analyses of these humans have provided new information about the subsistence and society of individuals buried at Natfieh. Natfieh is today agriculturally productive and must have been so in antiquity with most of the foodstuffs having been produced locally. The long distance between Natfieh and the closest aquatic food source (Mediterranean Sea and Lake Tiberias) and the high cost of land transportation might be the reason for the low consumption of marine protein. The results agree with past research on the Roman diet showing that plants were the common source of food for the Romans and fish may have been restricted to elite members of the society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-652
Number of pages8
JournalRadiocarbon
Volume52
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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tooth
bone
food
nitrogen isotope
subsistence
typology
carbon isotope
stable isotope
diet
protein
lake
fish
cost
society
archaeological site
Human Teeth
Jordan
Archaeological Sites
Human Remains
Paleodiet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Al-Bashaireh, K., Al-Shorman, A., Rose, J., Jull, A. J. T., & Hodgins, G. (2010). Paleodiet reconstruction of human remains from the archaeological site of Natfieh, northern Jordan. Radiocarbon, 52(2), 645-652.

Paleodiet reconstruction of human remains from the archaeological site of Natfieh, northern Jordan. / Al-Bashaireh, Khaled; Al-Shorman, Abdullah; Rose, Jerome; Jull, A.J. Timothy; Hodgins, Gregory.

In: Radiocarbon, Vol. 52, No. 2, 08.2010, p. 645-652.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Bashaireh, K, Al-Shorman, A, Rose, J, Jull, AJT & Hodgins, G 2010, 'Paleodiet reconstruction of human remains from the archaeological site of Natfieh, northern Jordan', Radiocarbon, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 645-652.
Al-Bashaireh, Khaled ; Al-Shorman, Abdullah ; Rose, Jerome ; Jull, A.J. Timothy ; Hodgins, Gregory. / Paleodiet reconstruction of human remains from the archaeological site of Natfieh, northern Jordan. In: Radiocarbon. 2010 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 645-652.
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