Pancreas Transplant pathology: A morphologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic comparison of allogeneic grafts with rejection, syngeneic grafts, and chronic pancreatitis

R. E. Nakhleh, Rainer W G Gruessner, P. E. Swanson, P. J. Tzardis, K. Brayman, D. L. Dunn, D. E R Sutherland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an effort to establish diagnostic criteria for rejection and recurrent disease in transplanted pancreases, a comparative study was performed based on clinical diagnosis. Clinical rejection was diagnosed in patients who had decreased urinary amylase or increased blood glucose; they were treated for rejection and improved. A clinical diagnosis of recurrent diabetes was made in syngeneic transplant recipients with islet dysfunction. In addition, two control groups were used-nontransplant, nondiabetic pancreatitis patients and pretransplant normal biopsies from patients in the study. Morphologically, tissues were assessed for acinar inflammation, ductal changes, islet and nerve inflammation, and vascular changes. Immunohistochemical staining for insulin and glucagon was also performed to quantitate differences between the groups. Vascular changes (endothelialitis, vasculitis, obliterative endarteritis) were specific for rejection. Also, rejection was characterized by a lymphocytic or mixed infiltrate that involved the ducts. Recurrent diabetes was characterized by selective loss of β cells with isletitis. Leukocyte common antigen and UCHL1 staining was helpful in identifying islet inflammation. An insulin/glucagon ratio of <1.0 appears to be specific for recurrent disease and in the absence of iletitis is a reasonable method for detecting recurrent disease at an early stage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-256
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume15
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Graft Pancreatitis
Chronic Pancreatitis
Graft Rejection
Pancreas
Electrons
Pathology
Inflammation
Glucagon
Transplants
Blood Vessels
Endarteritis
Insulin
Staining and Labeling
CD45 Antigens
Amylases
Vasculitis
Pancreatitis
Blood Glucose
Biopsy
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Pancreas
  • Rejection
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Pancreas Transplant pathology : A morphologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic comparison of allogeneic grafts with rejection, syngeneic grafts, and chronic pancreatitis. / Nakhleh, R. E.; Gruessner, Rainer W G; Swanson, P. E.; Tzardis, P. J.; Brayman, K.; Dunn, D. L.; Sutherland, D. E R.

In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Vol. 15, No. 3, 1991, p. 246-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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