Paper microfluidics for red wine tasting

Tu San Park, Cayla Baynes, Seong In Cho, Jeong-Yeol Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A paper microfluidic chip was designed and fabricated to evaluate the taste of 10 different red wines using a set of chemical dyes. The digital camera of a smartphone captured the images, and its red-green-blue (RGB) pixel intensities were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Using 8 dyes and 2 principal components (PCs), we were able to distinguish each wine by the grape variety and the oxidation status. Through comparing with the flavor map by human evaluation, PC1 seemed to represent the sweetness and PC2 the bodyness of red wine. This superior performance is attributed to: (1) careful selection of commercially available dyes through a series of linear correlation studies with the taste chemicals in red wines, (2) minimization of sample-to-sample variation by splitting a single sample into multiple wells on the paper microfluidics, and (3) filtration of particulate matter through paper fibers. The image processing and PCA procedure can eventually be implemented as a stand-alone smartphone application and can be adopted as an extremely low-cost, disposable, fully handheld, easy-to-use, yet sensitive and specific quality control method for appraising red wine or similar beverage products in resource-limited environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24356-24362
Number of pages7
JournalRSC Advances
Volume4
Issue number46
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Wine
Microfluidics
Dyes
Smartphones
Principal component analysis
Coloring Agents
Beverages
Particulate Matter
Flavors
Digital cameras
Quality control
Image processing
Pixels
Oxidation
Fibers
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

San Park, T., Baynes, C., Cho, S. I., & Yoon, J-Y. (2014). Paper microfluidics for red wine tasting. RSC Advances, 4(46), 24356-24362. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4ra01471e

Paper microfluidics for red wine tasting. / San Park, Tu; Baynes, Cayla; Cho, Seong In; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol.

In: RSC Advances, Vol. 4, No. 46, 2014, p. 24356-24362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

San Park, T, Baynes, C, Cho, SI & Yoon, J-Y 2014, 'Paper microfluidics for red wine tasting', RSC Advances, vol. 4, no. 46, pp. 24356-24362. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4ra01471e
San Park, Tu ; Baynes, Cayla ; Cho, Seong In ; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol. / Paper microfluidics for red wine tasting. In: RSC Advances. 2014 ; Vol. 4, No. 46. pp. 24356-24362.
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