Parent- and Child-Reported Asthma Responsibility in School-Age Children: Examining Agreement, Disagreement, and Family Functioning

Jennifer Sonney, Chris G Segrin, Tessa Kolstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The school-age years represent a critical time for children to begin assuming shared asthma management responsibility. This study aimed to describe parent- and child-reported asthma responsibility, examine agreement and disagreement, and explore family functioning as a predictor of agreement/disagreement. Methods: Twenty children (age range = 6–11 years) and one of their parents participated in this cross-sectional study. Parent–child dyads independently reported on their asthma management responsibility and asthma control. Parents also completed family functioning and demographic questionnaires. Results: There was a significant difference between parent and child asthma responsibility scores (t(19) = 2.46, p <.05), indicating that children saw themselves as assuming greater responsibilities than their parents did. A regression analysis showed that collectively, family functioning predicted 74% of the variance in parent–child disagreement (F(6,15) = 4.17, p <.05). Discussion: Family functioning may be an important factor in promoting shared management of asthma in school-age children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatric Health Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Asthma
Parents
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • Asthma self-management
  • behavior control
  • communication
  • family functioning
  • shared management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Parent- and Child-Reported Asthma Responsibility in School-Age Children: Examining Agreement, Disagreement, and Family Functioning",
abstract = "Introduction: The school-age years represent a critical time for children to begin assuming shared asthma management responsibility. This study aimed to describe parent- and child-reported asthma responsibility, examine agreement and disagreement, and explore family functioning as a predictor of agreement/disagreement. Methods: Twenty children (age range = 6–11 years) and one of their parents participated in this cross-sectional study. Parent–child dyads independently reported on their asthma management responsibility and asthma control. Parents also completed family functioning and demographic questionnaires. Results: There was a significant difference between parent and child asthma responsibility scores (t(19) = 2.46, p <.05), indicating that children saw themselves as assuming greater responsibilities than their parents did. A regression analysis showed that collectively, family functioning predicted 74{\%} of the variance in parent–child disagreement (F(6,15) = 4.17, p <.05). Discussion: Family functioning may be an important factor in promoting shared management of asthma in school-age children.",
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