Partial characterization of a togavirus (LOVV) associated with histopathological changes of the lymphoid organ of penaeid shrimps

J. R. Bonami, Donald V Lightner, R. M. Redman, B. T. Poulos

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Abstract

Histological and ultrastructural studies of abnormal lymphoid organs from a populat~on of cultured Penaeus vannamei (Crustacea: Decapoda) revealed the presence of a previously unreported virus infecting this group of marine invertebrate animals. Named LOW (lymphoid organ vacuolization virus), the virus was found in the cytoplasm of lymphoid organ cells which had a highly vacuolated cytoplasm and intracytoplasmic eosinophilic to pale basophilic, Feulgen negative, inclusion bodies. Many affected cells also possessed pyknotic or karyorrhectic nuclei. In some foci, affected lymphoid cells formed large multicellular spherical structures, termed spheroids, which lacked a central vessel. Icosahedral nucleocapsids averaging 30 nm in diameter were present in dense cytoplasmica ggregates, occasionally forming paracrystalline arrays, or a s single rows of particles thatwere closely associated with host cell membranes where they acquired their host-membrane-derived envelope. Purified enveloped virions had a buoyant density of 1.23 g ml-1 and a diameter of 52 to 54 nm, while nucleocapsids were icosahedral in shape. 30 to 31 nm in diameter, and exhibited a buoyant density of 1.32 g ml-1 Constitutive polypeptides had a molecular weight of 70. 60, 38 and 37 kDa. Based on its size, structure, and virogenesis, LOVV is considered to be a member of the Togaviridae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-152
Number of pages8
JournalDiseases of Aquatic Organisms
Volume14
StatePublished - 1992

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Togaviridae
Penaeidae
nucleocapsid
virus
cytoplasm
viruses
membrane
Litopenaeus vannamei
inclusion bodies
cells
size structure
virion
Decapoda
cell membranes
polypeptides
vessel
Crustacea
invertebrate
invertebrates
molecular weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Partial characterization of a togavirus (LOVV) associated with histopathological changes of the lymphoid organ of penaeid shrimps. / Bonami, J. R.; Lightner, Donald V; Redman, R. M.; Poulos, B. T.

In: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, Vol. 14, 1992, p. 145-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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