Parties and the presidential nominating contests

The battles to control the nominating calendar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The presidential nomination calendar extends from the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary, typically held in February, to several clusters of states on “Super Tuesdays” in March, and finally, to a few states holding out with traditional primary dates in the first weeks of June. The order of the states along this calendar is not structured in any rational manner. States adopt dates to their pleasing, with the national political parties trying to impose some restrictions. Yet each election cycle introduces another example of the conflict between the national parties, state parties, and candidates in trying to mold the presidential nomination calendar to satisfy their own individual goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Parties Respond
Subtitle of host publicationChanges in American Parties and Campaigns, Fifth Edition
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages161-180
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9780429962943
ISBN (Print)9780813346007
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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party state
candidacy
election

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Norrander, B. (2018). Parties and the presidential nominating contests: The battles to control the nominating calendar. In The Parties Respond: Changes in American Parties and Campaigns, Fifth Edition (pp. 161-180). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429494390

Parties and the presidential nominating contests : The battles to control the nominating calendar. / Norrander, Barbara.

The Parties Respond: Changes in American Parties and Campaigns, Fifth Edition. Taylor and Francis, 2018. p. 161-180.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Norrander, B 2018, Parties and the presidential nominating contests: The battles to control the nominating calendar. in The Parties Respond: Changes in American Parties and Campaigns, Fifth Edition. Taylor and Francis, pp. 161-180. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429494390
Norrander B. Parties and the presidential nominating contests: The battles to control the nominating calendar. In The Parties Respond: Changes in American Parties and Campaigns, Fifth Edition. Taylor and Francis. 2018. p. 161-180 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429494390
Norrander, Barbara. / Parties and the presidential nominating contests : The battles to control the nominating calendar. The Parties Respond: Changes in American Parties and Campaigns, Fifth Edition. Taylor and Francis, 2018. pp. 161-180
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