Patient weight as a predictor of pain response to morphine in the emergency department

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: There is little evidence that patient weight is associated with pain response to morphine in the emergency department (ED). The primary outcome of this study is to identify demographic variables including patient weight that are associated with an adequate pain reduction after the first dose of morphine. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients with severe nontraumatic abdominal pain receiving intravenous morphine was conducted in our ED over a 3-month time period. Pain score, using an 11-point verbal numerical pain scale (0-10), was measured before and after each dose of morphine. Adequate response was defined as a ≥ 4-point reduction from baseline pain score. Results: A total of 105 patients were included in the analysis. Univariate logistic regression analyses stratified by dose (2 or 4 mg) showed that patient weight was not predictive of adequate pain response after the first dose of morphine (2 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .88; 4 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .86). Conclusions: Patient weight may not predict pain response to morphine in the ED. Dosing strategies based on patient weight may not be necessary in this patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-113
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Morphine
Hospital Emergency Service
Weights and Measures
Pain
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Abdominal Pain
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

Keywords

  • Analgesia
  • Emergency
  • Morphine
  • Pain
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Patient weight as a predictor of pain response to morphine in the emergency department. / Patanwala, Asad E; Biggs, Adam D.; Erstad, Brian L.

In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 24, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 109-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{62b227f1744646408c887edc53f52c87,
title = "Patient weight as a predictor of pain response to morphine in the emergency department",
abstract = "Study Objectives: There is little evidence that patient weight is associated with pain response to morphine in the emergency department (ED). The primary outcome of this study is to identify demographic variables including patient weight that are associated with an adequate pain reduction after the first dose of morphine. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients with severe nontraumatic abdominal pain receiving intravenous morphine was conducted in our ED over a 3-month time period. Pain score, using an 11-point verbal numerical pain scale (0-10), was measured before and after each dose of morphine. Adequate response was defined as a ≥ 4-point reduction from baseline pain score. Results: A total of 105 patients were included in the analysis. Univariate logistic regression analyses stratified by dose (2 or 4 mg) showed that patient weight was not predictive of adequate pain response after the first dose of morphine (2 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95{\%} confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .88; 4 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95{\%} confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .86). Conclusions: Patient weight may not predict pain response to morphine in the ED. Dosing strategies based on patient weight may not be necessary in this patient population.",
keywords = "Analgesia, Emergency, Morphine, Pain, Weight",
author = "Patanwala, {Asad E} and Biggs, {Adam D.} and Erstad, {Brian L}",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1177/0897190010362772",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "109--113",
journal = "Journal of Pharmacy Practice",
issn = "0897-1900",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient weight as a predictor of pain response to morphine in the emergency department

AU - Patanwala, Asad E

AU - Biggs, Adam D.

AU - Erstad, Brian L

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - Study Objectives: There is little evidence that patient weight is associated with pain response to morphine in the emergency department (ED). The primary outcome of this study is to identify demographic variables including patient weight that are associated with an adequate pain reduction after the first dose of morphine. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients with severe nontraumatic abdominal pain receiving intravenous morphine was conducted in our ED over a 3-month time period. Pain score, using an 11-point verbal numerical pain scale (0-10), was measured before and after each dose of morphine. Adequate response was defined as a ≥ 4-point reduction from baseline pain score. Results: A total of 105 patients were included in the analysis. Univariate logistic regression analyses stratified by dose (2 or 4 mg) showed that patient weight was not predictive of adequate pain response after the first dose of morphine (2 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .88; 4 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .86). Conclusions: Patient weight may not predict pain response to morphine in the ED. Dosing strategies based on patient weight may not be necessary in this patient population.

AB - Study Objectives: There is little evidence that patient weight is associated with pain response to morphine in the emergency department (ED). The primary outcome of this study is to identify demographic variables including patient weight that are associated with an adequate pain reduction after the first dose of morphine. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients with severe nontraumatic abdominal pain receiving intravenous morphine was conducted in our ED over a 3-month time period. Pain score, using an 11-point verbal numerical pain scale (0-10), was measured before and after each dose of morphine. Adequate response was defined as a ≥ 4-point reduction from baseline pain score. Results: A total of 105 patients were included in the analysis. Univariate logistic regression analyses stratified by dose (2 or 4 mg) showed that patient weight was not predictive of adequate pain response after the first dose of morphine (2 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .88; 4 mg: odds ratio = 1; 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.03; P = .86). Conclusions: Patient weight may not predict pain response to morphine in the ED. Dosing strategies based on patient weight may not be necessary in this patient population.

KW - Analgesia

KW - Emergency

KW - Morphine

KW - Pain

KW - Weight

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78049474649&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78049474649&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0897190010362772

DO - 10.1177/0897190010362772

M3 - Article

C2 - 21507879

AN - SCOPUS:78049474649

VL - 24

SP - 109

EP - 113

JO - Journal of Pharmacy Practice

JF - Journal of Pharmacy Practice

SN - 0897-1900

IS - 1

ER -