Patients' perspectives of patient-centredness as important in musculoskeletal physiotherapy interactions: A qualitative study

Martin O. Kidd, Carol H. Bond, Melanie L Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine patients' perspectives of components of patient-centred physiotherapy and its essential elements. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews to explore patients' judgements of patient-centred physiotherapy. Grounded theory was used to determine common themes among the interviews and develop theory iteratively from the data. Setting: Musculoskeletal outpatient physiotherapy at a provincial city hospital. Participants: Eight individuals who had recently received physiotherapy. Results: Five categories of characteristics relating to patient-centred physiotherapy were generated from the data: the ability to communicate; confidence; knowledge and professionalism; an understanding of people and an ability to relate; and transparency of progress and outcome. These categories did not tend to occur in isolation, but formed a composite picture of patient-centred physiotherapy from the patient's perspective. Conclusions and practice implications: This research elucidates and reinforces the importance of patient-centredness in physiotherapy, and suggests that patients may be the best judges of the affective, non-technical aspects of a given healthcare episode.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-162
Number of pages9
JournalPhysiotherapy
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Interviews
Urban Hospitals
Outpatients
Delivery of Health Care
Research
Grounded Theory
Professionalism

Keywords

  • Good physiotherapy
  • Patient care
  • Patient centredness
  • Patient satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Patients' perspectives of patient-centredness as important in musculoskeletal physiotherapy interactions : A qualitative study. / Kidd, Martin O.; Bond, Carol H.; Bell, Melanie L.

In: Physiotherapy, Vol. 97, No. 2, 06.2011, p. 154-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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