Pediatric morning report: An appraisal

Leslie L. Barton, Sydney A Rice, Susan J. Wells, Allan D. Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined and contrasted morning reports at two hospitals, university and community, that have a pediatric residency program. Patient diagnoses assigned at morning report were compared with final diagnoses to assess disease categories discussed and the value of including outpatient follow-up in this educational forum. Data were obtained during morning reports for 6 months by chief residents at university and private community hospitals. Pertinent history, physical examination, and laboratory and radiologic findings were recorded and were assigned a tentative morning report diagnosis based on morning report discussion. Cases were then reviewed at discharge and at 6 months to determine final diagnoses. At the university hospital, 58% of the cases were undiagnosed before presentation at morning report. Of those cases, 23% were assigned a diagnosis at morning report that differed from the final diagnosis. Similarly, at the private community hospital, 28% of cases were undiagnosed before presentation at morning report. Of those cases, 73% were assigned a diagnosis that differed from the final diagnosis. We conclude that the provision of follow-up at morning report is important for maximizing resident education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-583
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume36
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1997

Fingerprint

Teaching Rounds
Pediatrics
Private Hospitals
Community Hospital
Internship and Residency
Physical Examination
Outpatients
History
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Barton, L. L., Rice, S. A., Wells, S. J., & Friedman, A. D. (1997). Pediatric morning report: An appraisal. Clinical Pediatrics, 36(10), 581-583.

Pediatric morning report : An appraisal. / Barton, Leslie L.; Rice, Sydney A; Wells, Susan J.; Friedman, Allan D.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 36, No. 10, 10.1997, p. 581-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barton, LL, Rice, SA, Wells, SJ & Friedman, AD 1997, 'Pediatric morning report: An appraisal', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 581-583.
Barton LL, Rice SA, Wells SJ, Friedman AD. Pediatric morning report: An appraisal. Clinical Pediatrics. 1997 Oct;36(10):581-583.
Barton, Leslie L. ; Rice, Sydney A ; Wells, Susan J. ; Friedman, Allan D. / Pediatric morning report : An appraisal. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 1997 ; Vol. 36, No. 10. pp. 581-583.
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