Perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation among individuals with first-episode psychosis

Heather M. Wastler, Aubrey M. Moe, Jacob G. Pine, Nicholas J.K. Breitborde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP) are at elevated risk for suicide. The current study explored the applicability of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS) as a model for understanding suicide in FEP. Thirty-nine individuals with FEP completed measures of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capability for suicide, and suicidal ideation. Results indicate that participants with recent suicidal ideation have greater levels of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness than those without recent suicidal ideation. In contrast, the interaction of IPTS variables did not predict the severity of suicidal ideation across the entire sample. These findings suggest that burdensomeness and belongingness differentiate between individuals with and without suicidal ideation, although these constructs might be less useful in predicting the severity of suicidal ideation among individuals with psychosis. Further research is needed to understand both transdiagnostic and unique risk factors that contribute to the high rates of suicide in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1033-1037
Number of pages5
JournalEarly Intervention in Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • interpersonal theory of suicide
  • psychosis
  • schizophrenia
  • suicidal ideation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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