Perceived discrimination in U.S. healthcare: Charting the effects of key social characteristics within and across racial groups

Corey - Abramson, Manata Hashemi, Martín Sánchez-Jankowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article employs an original empirical analysis to contribute to scientific understandings of the relationship between social characteristics and perceptions of discrimination in healthcare encounters within and across racial categories in the U.S. Our analysis focuses on a diverse sample of 43,020 adults aged 18 to 85 drawn from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). We use a series of weighted descriptive statistics and logistic regression models to parse out factors associated with perceived discrimination and chart how they vary by race and ethnicity. Members of racial minorities were more likely to report perceptions of discrimination, and while the effect was somewhat mitigated by introducing patient and health-care system factors into our models, the race effects remained both statistically significant and of substantial magnitude (particularly for African Americans and Native Americans). Poor self-reported health and communication difficulties in the clinical encounter were associated with increased perceptions of discrimination across all groups. Further, among non-whites, increased education was associated with increased perceptions of discrimination net of other factors. These findings suggest efforts to reduce disparities in medical care should continue to focus on expanding the depth and quality of patient-provider interactions for disadvantaged racial groups, while also being attentive to other factors that affect perceived racial discrimination in healthcare encounters within and across racial groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-621
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 21 2015

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
Logistic Models
Social Perception
Health Communication
Racism
North American Indians
Vulnerable Populations
Health Surveys
African Americans
Patient Care
Sociological Factors
Discrimination (Psychology)
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • Healthcare
  • Perceived discrimination
  • Prejudice
  • Psychosocial factors
  • Racial disparities
  • Socioeconomic factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Perceived discrimination in U.S. healthcare : Charting the effects of key social characteristics within and across racial groups. / Abramson, Corey -; Hashemi, Manata; Sánchez-Jankowski, Martín.

In: Preventive Medicine Reports, Vol. 2, 21.07.2015, p. 615-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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